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Thread: The 83 Percent

  1. #1
    New Member cyclismo123's Avatar
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    The 83 Percent

    I have looked around here and can't seem to find an answer to this nagging question. If I missed it apologies.

    As a rule of thumb a structural ridge line should be 83 percent of the hammock length. Two parter:

    I presume the length we are talking about is the hammock length as it it were flat on the floor?

    Suppose this rule of thumb doesn't work. Does increasing or decreasing the ridgeline length increase sag, an by extension flatness of lay?

    Much obliged in advance.
    To the pessimist the glass is half empty, to the optimist half full. To the engineer the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.

  2. #2
    New Member r34ryan's Avatar
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    I run a 25' ridgeline and it seems to work well But I have several longer and shorter lengths on my rack just because I already use those lengths for climbing/rigging different stuff.

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    Redoleary's Avatar
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    Yes 83% of the length of the hammock fabric as laid out on the floor, measured in inches.
    83% is just a good starting point. Less than 83% will give more sag greater than 83% will give less sag only you can be the judge as to which feels best.
    Good luck,
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    Roadrunnr72's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclismo123 View Post
    I have looked around here and can't seem to find an answer to this nagging question. If I missed it apologies.

    As a rule of thumb a structural ridge line should be 83 percent of the hammock length. Two parter:

    I presume the length we are talking about is the hammock length as it it were flat on the floor?

    Suppose this rule of thumb doesn't work. Does increasing or decreasing the ridgeline length increase sag, an by extension flatness of lay?

    Much obliged in advance.
    The first poster must be referring to tarps.

    As for a hammock, yes, the 83% of the length of hammock when stretched out, or layed on the floor. I use a whoopie sling for my ridgeline, so I can adjust either way. If you shorten the ridge, it will give more sag, some find this more comfortable. I recommend using the adjustable ridge, then when you find the sweet spot,you can leave it. I use one of the bread wrapper twist ties to keep the whoopie from coming off the hammock.
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  5. #5
    hangNyak's Avatar
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    Yes, it's the full hammock length if laid flat. Rule of thumb is 80-85%, I believe. Testing it for yourself to find the perfect lay for you. 83% would be about average.
    RON

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    SilvrSurfr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclismo123 View Post
    I have looked around here and can't seem to find an answer to this nagging question. If I missed it apologies.

    As a rule of thumb a structural ridge line should be 83 percent of the hammock length. Two parter:

    I presume the length we are talking about is the hammock length as it it were flat on the floor?

    Suppose this rule of thumb doesn't work. Does increasing or decreasing the ridgeline length increase sag, an by extension flatness of lay?

    Much obliged in advance.
    Is this a hypothetical or are you having a particular problem? I've experimented with the 83% rule, give or take a few degrees, but always come back to it.

  7. #7
    GrizzlyAdams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclismo123 View Post
    I have looked around here and can't seem to find an answer to this nagging question. If I missed it apologies.

    As a rule of thumb a structural ridge line should be 83 percent of the hammock length. Two parter:

    I presume the length we are talking about is the hammock length as it it were flat on the floor?
    yes.

    Quote Originally Posted by cyclismo123 View Post
    Suppose this rule of thumb doesn't work. Does increasing or decreasing the ridgeline length increase sag, an by extension flatness of lay?
    Much obliged in advance.
    Shortening the ridgeline will give more sag, since the fixed hammock length is now suspended from points that are closer. Longer ridgeline == less sag, by the same token.

    Somewhere there's a sweet spot---just where depends on the hammock and the individual---where by nestling in at the right spot in the hammock at the right angle with the right length ridgeline, you feel pretty flat.

    For a given ridgeline length, try different diagonal angles. Your spot may call for more of an angle than you'd imagine. If the problem is that you cannot escape the ridge of tension going down the hammock, then probably you're too tight and you want to shorten the ridgeline and get some more sag. If to get flat you have to have so much of a diagonal that you cannot keep your whole body on the hammock, then probably there's too much sag and you want to length it a bit.

    It can take some experimenting to get it dialed in for yourself.

    good luck
    Grizz
    (alias ProfessorHammock on youtube)

  8. #8
    Kyle's Avatar
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    Also, as a rule of thumb, going too short on the RL tends to increase hyper-extension of the knees while going too long tends to increase calf ridge issues.

  9. #9
    New Member cyclismo123's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone, question answered. The experimenting is the fun part!
    To the pessimist the glass is half empty, to the optimist half full. To the engineer the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.

  10. #10
    fallkniven's Avatar
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    That's where adjustable ridglines, come in handy. When you get a new hammock, put it on so you can adjust to find your sweet spot. measure that mark and replace it with a fixed ridgline. Or you could leave the adjustable one on too.

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