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  1. #1
    Member busan321's Avatar
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    Exclamation im suprised that there isn't more discussions about mayan hammocks

    I have used DIY gathered end hammocks made from bed sheets and spent a night or 2 in an eno doublenest and they were all pretty good but man they pale in comparison t the comfort of my Mayan hammocks I am really suupprised that there isn't more development. To make them the awesome camping hammocks they could be. Please I wild like to hear some of your thoughts on the matter

  2. #2
    Brute1100's Avatar
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    I am not knowledgeable on the Mayan hammocks... What makes them different?
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  3. #3
    Member busan321's Avatar
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    Its mostly the width that makes the diffrence my favorite Mayan hammock is 14 feet long but it fits in a gap anywhere from 11 to 17 feet. the the way it is woven the bed of it will stretch out 10.5 feet sideways. And the tightness of the weave keepsyou from getting that annoying waffle pattern on your skin ill post a few pics also they easily can fit 3 people in them comfortably and my nylon Mayan hammock is rated to 950 pounds and my cotton one is rated to 800 granted it is about a pound heavier than a wbbb
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    Last edited by busan321; 01-03-2013 at 23:39.

  4. #4
    dejoha's Avatar
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    Some of the authentic hammocks (Brazilian, Mayan, Venezuelan, etc.) are typically woven hammocks with tight loops, not like the "American" backyard hammocks with spreader bars. While there are subtle differences between the different varieties, I prefer to refer to them all as either Mayan or Brazilian style. They are gathered end hammocks and are typically larger in both width and length than any backpacking style hammock.



    I had an authentic Mayan hammock until only recently when I sold it off. Yes, it is amazingly comfortable. The weave provides a stretch that creates an unbeatable footbox and head cradle. This hammock was what converted my wife to hammocks.

    The big downside is that these hammocks are HEAVY and HUGE! Only the largest tarps can cover them and they require more hanging space as well. Typically, these hammocks are hung with deep sags so you can also get a really flat, ergonomic lay.

    The only "backpacking" hammock that I found comes close to the comfort of a Mayan style hammock was the DIY tablecloth hammock I made and are made by a few cottage vendors like Papa Smurf.

    Why aren't Mayan hammocks mentioned much? They occasionally come up in threads, especially when people talk about hanging full time at home. I know Cannibal has a few of them and others have sworn by them. But at home is where they pretty much stay. Again, pack weight, bulk, and hanging requirements make them difficult to use in the field.

    I think this is why hammocks used in camping are compromised hammocks that aim for the comfort of these authentic models by cut back on the width and length. While still comfortable (especially compared with the ground), they are not as amazing.

  5. #5
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    Wow, three people in a hammock. That is awesome.

    I wonder if anybody on the forum tried to make an ultra-lite version.

  6. #6
    dejoha's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by georgemaung View Post
    Wow, three people in a hammock. That is awesome.

    I wonder if anybody on the forum tried to make an ultra-lite version.
    I think the closest "ultra-light" version would be a large DIY tablecloth hammock.

  7. #7
    Member busan321's Avatar
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    I bet it could b easily done with a thinner higher strength thread something along the lines of spider wire fishingline

  8. #8
    Member busan321's Avatar
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    The trick would be having Someone that knows how to weave them

  9. #9
    Member busan321's Avatar
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    here's a better pic of the weave of a Mayan hammock and yes the Mayan hammock wouldn't make a good backpacking hammock but it would make a great camping hammock or if you were touring on your bicycle it wouldn't be a problem. also if it is too long you can tie slipknots in the ends close to the loops and put a toggle through the loop of the slipknot and you can get the hanging distance down to about 9.5 to 10 feet
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    Last edited by busan321; 01-04-2013 at 00:14.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
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    Love me some Mayans, but I'm not carrying one.

    Even if you were to go with a narrow lightweight cord, it's going to be heavy. The thinner the cord, the tighter the weave. The tighter the weave, the more cord required. The more cord required, the more weight added. You might get a lightweight version of a Mayan, but I don't think it would approach most camping setups.

    That doesn't even take into account the primary reason I wouldn't take a Mayan into the woods: sticks, twigs, and various crud...oh my! Everything, I do mean everything, that touches a Mayan seems to get sucked up into its spider web. I frequently have a Mayan or two hanging on our property during the summer. I get up to go fix the hole in the bottom of my beer bottle and by the time I come back, I've got to spend time picking little pieces of whatever that happened to fall from the trees in my absence. Quite annoying in the yard, but would be infuriating in the field when you miss that one twig that pokes you right in the kidney at 2am. Nope, not me! I'm taking my nice slick and twig-resistant nylon or polyester fabric hammocks into those twiggy woods. The Mayans are for home, where it's OK to be lazy.
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