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  1. #1
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    Help---overwhelmed

    Good morning all--
    I received my nx-200 for Christmas and had my first opportunity to sleep in it last night...I have had it set up for three days playing with it, but just now been able to get out of the house and try it out...
    My problems:
    1. has anyone experienced motion sickness while hanging at night? It may have been the chili I ate, but around 4 am, i woke up nauseaed....
    2. The rain fly---I seen several posts, read the manual, and even watched the video but I could not get mine to look like some of your pictures--my rain fly(the one that comes with the nx-200) to pitch as tight as everyone elses without feeling like the bungies would break.....My thought was I need to run a separate ridgeline separate from teh hammock and have it be above the tent a few feet....I used some tools from teh garage to serve as tie outs wtih height...ie..i tied to a shovel and a pair of post hole diggers on one side...
    3. I think this is related to my fly not being i ncorrect position, but I was not able to zip up the bug net all the way....It was too tight and would only zip up to about my chin level and not over my entire head....
    4. Lastly, does the rain fly center seam need to be sealed? While water didnt leak through, when i touched it, my finger would get wet.

    Thanks for the help....
    Allen

  2. #2
    MacEntyre's Avatar
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    That's a real shame that you got queasy... hasn't happened to me since my early days in the north atlantic aboard a small tug. Never thought about it happening in a hammock. For me it was something I learned to overcome by putting it aside until it became insignificant. For others, it was impossible to overcome.

    Try this: Get an open travel hammock and lie in it on a sunny day with a good book. You'll be comfortable and will get used to it. Later, when you get inside an enclosed hammock, it will all be very cozy and familiar.
    "We must, indeed, all hang together or, most assuredly, we shall all hang separately." - Ben Franklin
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  3. #3
    Mrprez's Avatar
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    Hang the hammock without the fly and leave the bugnet open and thrown aside and get used to the slight swinging motion without being closed up.

  4. #4
    Senior Member RAW's Avatar
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    And in order to help you with your hang, we'll need to see pictures of how you're currently hanging it.

    Here are some pics of my NX-200 with the stock rainfly


    Here's with one side of the fly disconnected and thrown over to the far side.


    One corner lifted with a stick



    Normal



    The only difference between my setup and stock is that I'm using straps for my main suspension.

  5. #5
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    thanks for the pictures---ill try and take same of mine to post for critique(sp)...my initial thought is I still dont have it set up properly....not very good at following directions...im planning on trying again tonight....

  6. #6
    Senior Member RAW's Avatar
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    I'd also suggest going out and tying up the rainfly by itself.
    Forget about the hammock momentarily.

    You have to tie the foot end of the rainfly a little higher than the head end because of that little extended "foot".
    Tie the ridgeline rope out to the trees pretty tightly.
    Then stake down the four "corner" tie-outs tightly (realizing that you typically don't use the 2 tabs at the extreme foot end).

    Clear as mud?

  7. #7

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    I've noticed that my hammock became much more stable (less rocking) when I went to a cc buckle and 1" webbing. The flatness of the buckle and webbing tend to help eliminate rocking even if you have rope coming from the hammock to the buckle. Mighta just been the Chilli.

    Miguel

  8. #8
    Doctari's Avatar
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    Also bear in mind that there is quite a bit of a learning curve with hanging, so it may take you a number of tries to "get it right". Just keep at it & soon you will be off the ground for good.

    As to the nausia, lets hope it was the chili. Poor food choices has been the only cause of nausia in the hammock for me, in fact most times I actually make the hammock swing to help me fall asleep, & yet I suffer from motion sickness, go figure. One way to at least reduce the swinging motion & maybe the nausia, is a elastic cord tied to the hammock & staked to the ground, it may take one on each side, I found this stops the swinging almost immediatly. Took them off real quick
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  9. #9
    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
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    Yep - I rarely use side tie-outs b/c I like to swing myself to sleep. So check out some pics of the HH models and copy that onto your hammock.
    “Republics are created by the virtue, public spirit, and intelligence of the citizens. They fall when the wise are banished from the public councils because they dare to be honest, and the profligate are rewarded because they flatter the people, in order to betray them.” ~Judge Joseph Story

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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctari View Post
    Also bear in mind that there is quite a bit of a learning curve with hanging, so it may take you a number of tries to "get it right". Just keep at it & soon you will be off the ground for good.

    As to the nausia, lets hope it was the chili. Poor food choices has been the only cause of nausia in the hammock for me, in fact most times I actually make the hammock swing to help me fall asleep, & yet I suffer from motion sickness, go figure. One way to at least reduce the swinging motion & maybe the nausia, is a elastic cord tied to the hammock & staked to the ground, it may take one on each side, I found this stops the swinging almost immediatly. Took them off real quick
    I tie the left side elastic loosely to the left head end D fastex buckle on my Macat, keeps the net out of my face. The swinging doesn't bother me and I get motion sickness fairly easy. I can never read in a car.

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