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  1. #1
    New Member JALegg's Avatar
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    Any Diabetics Here?

    Hello all,

    I've had Type I Diabetes for 14 years this month and I was wondering what y'all do with your supplies hanging around. Where do you keep your meter or low supplies or other necessary things?

    Any other tips/tricks you find work would also be helpful.

    Thanks a bunch!

  2. #2
    Senior Member Overgrown's Avatar
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    I keep my meter and my too low tabs in a small pocket on the right side of my pack, if I walk away from camp the tablets go with me.

    Best advice I can offer is to get a dehydrator so you can still control your diet on the trail, meals like Mountain House are high in sodium and refined sugar.
    "Think Outside the Tent"

  3. #3
    Doctari's Avatar
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    YEA, I"m New (that's: NEW) Dignosed March of last year.
    What to do when it's cold out? I left my meter in the car a few months ago, got down to about 35. Later that night I felt like my sugar was WAY low (felt like around 40), Meter said 145, then 135, then 120 (120 normal for me). So, how do I check when it's COLD out?
    I called work & they sent a medic, blood sugar was low at 38, so not an issue. But I do worry, can't always tell especially if HIGH.

    ANY other tips appreciated too.

    Thanks for starting this!
    When you have a backpack on, no matter where you are, you’re home.
    PAIN is INEVITABLE. MISERY is OPTIONAL.

  4. #4
    Ramblinrev's Avatar
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    The meter and strips go in the sleeping bag at night to stay usably warm. In cold weather during the day they stay close to the body. In normal weather I carry everything in a belt pack like a kilt sporran. The biggest problem I have faced is when my insulin has gotten too cold. That destroys its effectiveness.

    The other concern is keeping a sugar source in the hammock at night in bear country. Smellies should be stored away.
    I may be slow... But I sure am gimpy.

    "Bless you child, when you set out to thread a needle don't hold the thread still and fetch the needle up to it; hold the needle still and poke the thread at it; that's the way a woman most always does, but a man always does t'other way."
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  5. #5
    Member nj4x4fever's Avatar
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    Former type II diabetic, got over it with education, nutrition, exercising, sacrifice, and mostly portion control.
    I also lost most of my vision for a few months and that was terrifying. My vision has improved since then but It isn't 100% yet.

  6. #6
    New Member JALegg's Avatar
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    On really cold nights I'd probably keep my insulin and meter/kit in with me to keep it warm and in proper working order.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Les Rust's Avatar
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    Here is some information from an article from Hiking Research that offers some good news for diabetics and everyone else too! We're doing something right by just being in the woods. The following paragraphs are from article "What Green Can Do for Public Health."

    A growing body of research is revealing the benefits of time in nature that can have significant public health implications. A study by Yoshinori Oshtsuka from the College of Education at Hokkaido University in Japan found that time in nature is beneficial for reducing blood glucose levels for those with type II diabetes. Time spent walking in a forest resulted in a much larger reduction of glucose levels in comparison to similar amounts of time spent walking outdoors in an urban setting, using a treadmill or underwater exercise. In the study glucose levels were reduced 39% (71 mg/dl ) from time spent in nature, by far the largest impact of any of the exercise regimes. The author hypothesizes that the phytoncides (chemicals) emitted by trees are presumed to be the factor impacting the greater reduction in glucose levels.

    Studies have also linked time in nature with increases in natural killer cells (NK) that help to strengthen immunity and aid in fighting off the development of tumors such as cancer. The phytoncides found in a forest setting help to increase NK cell activity. Research has found that a three day/ two night forest trip can increase NK cell activity for up to a month.
    Les Rust
    "My goal is to live long enough to become a character."

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