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  1. #1
    Senior Member animalcontrol's Avatar
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    Weather Sock Material...

    I've read many a post about these weather covers, socks, pods etc.
    Many have used materials laying around to make one...1.1, 1.7, 1.9, DWR (and not?) sil...you name it, someone has used it.
    I've read about condensation issues and the like using "less" breathable materials (sil)
    Well, I stumbled across 10+ yds of 1.1 ripstop at Walmart. I don't believe it is DWR treated.
    Will this work for a weather sock? I question if 1.1 will have enough "substance" to effectively block the wind to gain the 10* to make it worth while
    I'm interested in making a simple, functional sock for my BB. I want to cover top and bottom and I do not want to modify my BB (read - no velcro). I will still use a tarp for wet protection. I would like to keep weight to a minimum.

    So, the main question is- will 1.1 non-treated give me the protection I want?

    Ideas? Advice?
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  2. #2
    Senior Member NCPatrick's Avatar
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    Hmmm... I recently made a sock with some very thin uncoated 1.1 material, and I have to say it was mighty thin. I don't think you'll get as much of a wind block as you would with a heavier material, but you will get some protection.

    I've ordered some heavier material (70 denier uncoated) for my next sock/pod/whatever.

    My first sock was DWR 1.9, and while it was slightly heavy (which is subjective), I had no condensation and the wind-blocking abilities were pretty stout. It covered a lot of my mistakes with hanging in the wrong location (on a ridge on a very windy night, for instance).

    My guess is if you pick the right locations (i.e. out of the direct wind), you'll get more out of it even with the lighter materials.


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  3. #3
    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    I'm interested in the answer to that also. Would 1.1 non-treated be windproof? And wouldn't it need to be at least DWR? If I am going to fool with a sock or cover, I want it to keep side ways snow/rain or fog mostly off of my down UQ's or PeaPod's DWR shell. It seems that it would at least need to be DWR(while also still pretty breathable), but maybe not?

    I'd really like it to accomplish what my SS Sil-nylon UC does, but without the need for a VB between me and the down, to avoid condensation. I don't mind at all a vb (SB or heat sheet) between my hammock and either my SS OCF pad or my PeaPod lower layer, and I'm confident it will also work grandly with the MWUQ. But either the upper layer of a PeaPod or a top quilt would be a problem with sil-Nylon without VB clothing or liner, which might not be comfortable. So, back to DWR for a fully enclosing sock?

    What is on my mind is a few weeks back, I was planning on my first test of the MWUQ with the JRB BMBH. I had everything set up, but for some reason did not sleep out that night. I believe it had been a bit foggy. I got up before dawn to hop in the hammock, at about 27*F. I was not surprised to find the tarp weighed down with frost on the inner and outer layer. But the shell of the UQ, and the inside of the hammock, were covered with a THICK layer of frost, except the part of the hammock (inside bottom) that was covered by the sleeping bag. I stayed warm anyway, and maybe this cold fog would not have had caused as much frost on the quilt shells if I had been in the hammock contributing some body heat. But my first thought was "hammock sock", which would be extra interesting for the bridge hammock.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  4. #4
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    I have several fabrics lying around, 1.1 DWR, 1.9 ripstop non DWR, and some 0.9 Momentum 90 from Thruhiker.com. The latter was the lightest and most difficult to blow through of all of them, slightly more difficult to blow through than the 1.1 DWR ripstop, not to mention the lightest of all of them. Sometimes you get what you pay for. When I make a sock, I'll use whatever is cheap to get my design down, then I'll bite the bullet and use Momentum 90.

  5. #5
    Senior Member animalcontrol's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Take-a-knee View Post
    I have several fabrics lying around, 1.1 DWR, 1.9 ripstop non DWR, and some 0.9 Momentum 90 from Thruhiker.com. The latter was the lightest and most difficult to blow through of all of them, slightly more difficult to blow through than the 1.1 DWR ripstop, not to mention the lightest of all of them. Sometimes you get what you pay for. When I make a sock, I'll use whatever is cheap to get my design down, then I'll bite the bullet and use Momentum 90.
    I never considered a "blow through" test to simulate wind...DUH!!

    I will try this later today
    "Every day is a new day to a better future"
    "Of all the things that matter, that really and truly matter, working more efficiently and getting more done is not among them." ~ Mike Dooley
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by animalcontrol View Post
    I never considered a "blow through" test to simulate wind...DUH!!

    I will try this later today
    You can try to seal it around your mouth and see how easy it is to suck air through it as well. I think that is easier to do and get feedback on.
    Youngblood AT2000

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyBob58 View Post
    I'm interested in the answer to that also. Would 1.1 non-treated be windproof? And wouldn't it need to be at least DWR? If I am going to fool with a sock or cover, I want it to keep side ways snow/rain or fog mostly off of my down UQ's or PeaPod's DWR shell. It seems that it would at least need to be DWR(while also still pretty breathable), but maybe not?

    I'd really like it to accomplish what my SS Sil-nylon UC does, but without the need for a VB between me and the down, to avoid condensation. I don't mind at all a vb (SB or heat sheet) between my hammock and either my SS OCF pad or my PeaPod lower layer, and I'm confident it will also work grandly with the MWUQ. But either the upper layer of a PeaPod or a top quilt would be a problem with sil-Nylon without VB clothing or liner, which might not be comfortable. So, back to DWR for a fully enclosing sock?

    What is on my mind is a few weeks back, I was planning on my first test of the MWUQ with the JRB BMBH. I had everything set up, but for some reason did not sleep out that night. I believe it had been a bit foggy. I got up before dawn to hop in the hammock, at about 27*F. I was not surprised to find the tarp weighed down with frost on the inner and outer layer. But the shell of the UQ, and the inside of the hammock, were covered with a THICK layer of frost, except the part of the hammock (inside bottom) that was covered by the sleeping bag. I stayed warm anyway, and maybe this cold fog would not have had caused as much frost on the quilt shells if I had been in the hammock contributing some body heat. But my first thought was "hammock sock", which would be extra interesting for the bridge hammock.
    BillyBob, you understand how all this works. The problem is that what you want varies as the conditions vary. What works best in one scenario might be awful in another and vice versa.

    At times you may be trying to expel moist vapor to the outside world from when you are a tad too warm. Then you want a lot of breathability. Other times you may be trying to get all the warmth you can out of what insulation you have and keep cold wind away... and you might add wet cold wind to that.

    Think of what we go through backpacking. You wear different things depending on temperature, wind, and rain. An umbrella works great when it is warm with a light rain and no wind. If the temperature drops, the wind picks up, and the rain starts pouring down-- that umbrella with its great breathability doesn't cut it any more you want your rain suit and maybe a jacket underneath it. But you don't want to wear a rain suit all the time. Sometimes you might want just a wind suit that is more breathable but blocks the wind or just a jacket that is extremely breathable but doesn't block the wind. One arrangement isn't going to work all that well over a variety of conditions.

    In many ways it is not so different when we are sleeping. You need enough flexibility to deal with what the current conditions are. Hammock socks are one way that deals with that. The material that hammock sock is made of will determine when it works great, when it doesn't, and how much of a problem it is when it doesn't. Large tarps that can enclose a hammock have similar tradeoffs as to when you want them enclosed, partially enclosed, or wide open. And to add to the dilemma, the conditions can change during the night... sometimes several times.
    Youngblood AT2000

  8. #8
    Senior Member fin's Avatar
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    1. Make your sock out of the untreated ripstop.

    2. Suspend your sock on a clothesline.

    3. Treat everything except a 2 foot wide strip on the top of the sock, effectively "making your own sil" (lots of info on different things to use here on the site.)

    4. You now have a sock that a) blocks wind from below and sides and b) is breathable / has a breathable layer where it is needed - down the top strip of the sock.

    My .02.

  9. #9
    Senior Member animalcontrol's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishinFinn View Post
    1. Make your sock out of the untreated ripstop.

    2. Suspend your sock on a clothesline.

    3. Treat everything except a 2 foot wide strip on the top of the sock, effectively "making your own sil" (lots of info on different things to use here on the site.)

    4. You now have a sock that a) blocks wind from below and sides and b) is breathable / has a breathable layer where it is needed - down the top strip of the sock.

    My .02.
    awesome suggestion!

    What product would you personally use to treat with? (yes, there are probably THOUSANDS of options...)
    "Every day is a new day to a better future"
    "Of all the things that matter, that really and truly matter, working more efficiently and getting more done is not among them." ~ Mike Dooley
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  10. #10
    Senior Member headchange4u's Avatar
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    IMHO, untreated material is the best fabric for socks. Never had any condensation issues with mine.
    “Light thinks it travels faster than anything but it is wrong. No matter how fast light travels, it finds the darkness has always got there first, and is waiting for it." -Terry Pratchett



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