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  1. #1

    Winter UQ

    Haven't done much winter hammock camping but when I have my bottom side is always cold. I'm a warm sleeper but maybe I need a warmer UQ? I've read that some members feel that your quilts should be rated 20* below the temperature out, is this the general consensus? Please advise, thanks

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by JollyGreen View Post
    Haven't done much winter hammock camping but when I have my bottom side is always cold. I'm a warm sleeper but maybe I need a warmer UQ? I've read that some members feel that your quilts should be rated 20* below the temperature out, is this the general consensus? Please advise, thanks
    Lots of hangers supplement their higher temp rated UQ's with foam pads, reflectix etc. to help alleviate CBS [cold butt syndrome].

    The thing about a WARMER UQ is that you can always vent to make it cooler, but you can't always add enough to stay warm.

    Just my .02.

  3. #3
    markr6's Avatar
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    I think it's more of a test-and-see after making adjustments. Once you get it dialed in I think you should be able to take it down to, OR EVEN BELOW, the rating. Especially if you're a warm sleeper.

    I've taken my 20 Incubator down to 12 and that was no problem with Capilene 4 base layer. My 40 Incubator down to about 30 with just an extra 100wt fleece jacket.

    It's nice to be warm and err on the side of too much insulation, but you also want to be sure you've tried making all the adjustments before getting a new quilt.

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    Caveman's Avatar
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    I also believe that most uq trouble has to do with getting proper fit. Teaking and testing is so important.

    I've been to 18* with my 0* incubator and I'm confident I could go much colder with it. No cold spots at all.
    If you ain't havin' fun, you're doin' it wrong

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Caveman View Post
    I also believe that most uq trouble has to do with getting proper fit. Teaking and testing is so important.

    I've been to 18* with my 0* incubator and I'm confident I could go much colder with it. No cold spots at all.
    Wazzup Caveman, that's my question. You have been to 18* with your 0* UQ, or approximately 20* above what it's rated for. So to go to say single digits do I need a -20* UQ? If I'm hiking at all I don't want to carry pads and extras, the quilt I carry should be enough. Car camping is one thing but hiking is another.

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    Senior Member hangnout's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JollyGreen View Post
    ...... If I'm hiking at all I don't want to carry pads and extras, the quilt I carry should be enough. Car camping is one thing but hiking is another.
    This is the only reason I do not like the full length UQ. Too many people "replace" the pad with the FL UQ. A torso sized pad should be in every pack for colder temps. In fact the pad never leaves my pack. The UQ gets left behind in hot weather where you only need something a couple hours a night and the torso sized pad is used.

    The pad will cover going to ground, UQ wet/malfunction, and added warmth for unexpected temp drop. If I know I am going to be camping at the temp rating of the UQ I will include a larger pad to boost my insulation. Also I have never heard anybody complain about having more padding for your camp seat.

    Oh yeah, If you are only going to buy 1 UQ, get one that covers 3 season use for your region then supplement with a pad. Most people hike more Spring/Fall and only do an occasional winter trip. When in doubt go with the warmer quilt. Do not assume you can go 10-20* below a quilts temp rating. There are too many variables. I have used a 20* at 0* and then the next trip start getting cold when temps went below 20*.

    A small pad is just being prepared for a small weight/bulk penalty. You can tell not taking a pad pushed one of my buttons. Long live the (short) pad!

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    Quote Originally Posted by hangnout View Post
    This is the only reason I do not like the full length UQ. Too many people "replace" the pad with the FL UQ. A torso sized pad should be in every pack for colder temps. In fact the pad never leaves my pack. The UQ gets left behind in hot weather where you only need something a couple hours a night and the torso sized pad is used.

    The pad will cover going to ground, UQ wet/malfunction, and added warmth for unexpected temp drop. If I know I am going to be camping at the temp rating of the UQ I will include a larger pad to boost my insulation. Also I have never heard anybody complain about having more padding for your camp seat.

    Oh yeah, If you are only going to buy 1 UQ, get one that covers 3 season use for your region then supplement with a pad. Most people hike more Spring/Fall and only do an occasional winter trip. When in doubt go with the warmer quilt. Do not assume you can go 10-20* below a quilts temp rating. There are too many variables. I have used a 20* at 0* and then the next trip start getting cold when temps went below 20*.

    A small pad is just being prepared for a small weight/bulk penalty. You can tell not taking a pad pushed one of my buttons. Long live the (short) pad!
    Doesn't a pad block your body warming the down underquilt? I bought my underquilt to not have to have a pad that is far less comfortable than the hammock material and comfort.

  8. #8
    Senior Member hangnout's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bosman View Post
    Doesn't a pad block your body warming the down underquilt? I bought my underquilt to not have to have a pad that is far less comfortable than the hammock material and comfort.
    The point was that not taking a small pad because you have a full length UQ is not safe in cold temps. I agree that a FL UQ is more comfortable than a pad. I would only use the pad to supplement the UQ when needed or if I had to sleep on the ground because of a gear failure.

    The partial UQ's are a way of saving weight by hikers who are carrying the short pad anyways. They are a good balance between weight, comfort, and safety.

    Full Length UQ's ,with a short pad for backup, are the most comfortable but have a weight penalty for the UL hiker that is carrying the short pad for safety.

    I use a UQ that does not require a pad but I always have the pad with me. I chose a little more comfort over weight but I don't sacrifice the safety factor that a pad provides.

    BTW the pad provides warmth when your body and UQ can not keep up with the cold. Don't use the pad until it is needed but if you don't have it the only option is cold.

  9. #9
    Caveman's Avatar
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    I really don't think so. I'm very confident that I could go to 0* with what I have. Even if I got a little cool I could put on a bit more clothing.
    If you ain't havin' fun, you're doin' it wrong

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by JollyGreen View Post
    Wazzup Caveman, that's my question. You have been to 18* with your 0* UQ, or approximately 20* above what it's rated for. So to go to say single digits do I need a -20* UQ? If I'm hiking at all I don't want to carry pads and extras, the quilt I carry should be enough. Car camping is one thing but hiking is another.
    I roasted in my 20* incubator when it was 27*. Everyone sleeps different, and there's a lot of variables.

    Depends on calories ingested, hydration level, if the quilt ifs setup properly, wind, humidity, top insulation, clothes worn while sleeping, etc...

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