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  1. #1

    Am I over simplifying this?

    I'm a total newbie...educate me.

    I've looked at many threads, pages, and Grizzly Adams great videos on hanging a hammock. They all involve rings, buckles, & etc.

    I've simply been throwing a piece of webbing, with 2 loops at the end, around a tree. I thread one end through the other and pull it tight.

    From each end my hammock to the webbing, I'm using a piece of 6mm Prusik cord. I run the cord through the loop on the webbing and tie it back onto itself with a Taunt Line Hitch.

    Once the hitch is set, it's completely adjustable and won't slip on it's own. No, I wouldn't hang 10' in the air off a TLH, but my butts 2' off the ground, and I've never seen a set knot slip.

    Since I haven't seen anyone recommend this approach, I'm wondering what I'm missing?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Welcome!

    You are already there, using your noodle to create a good setup. You will be ok with this setup for several hangs, after which I bet you will start to think:

    Can I make this lighter?
    Can I make this easier to setup?
    Can I make this easier to adjust?
    Can I make this easier to tear down?
    How can I make this work on a longer/shorter hang distance?

    For instance, the simple addition of a carabiner to end of your webbing loops will allow you to set it up without disconnecting your hammock from any straps/lines during setup/tear down.

    Most folks here would not consider a taut-line hitch as a suitable load-bearing option, but you are welcome to Hang Your Own Hang....

    Again welcome to the madness! You like spelunking? I have done some amateur caving at Ft. Stanton, NM...fun stuff! One day, we were in the cave so long, we came out and it was snowing and we weren't prepared! We almost decided to just head back down into the cave because it was warmer....haha crazy kids...

  3. #3
    Senior Member OldRagFreeze's Avatar
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    If it works for you then that's fine, but for me I'd have problems with that rig. For one the line is (presumably) a bit heavier than needed. My main concern would be crawling into camp after a serious 20 mile day of hiking and lazily tying my taut-line... I'm sure that knot works when properly cinched down, but I am also sure if not properly tensioned before weighting you will end up on the ground... As you say no big deal from two feet as far as injury goes... But not so for your gear. A small snag or rock under you and now you've got a hole in the hammock...

    I know these aren't probably concerns of yours, but I'm just sharing what my personal objections would be to using that set up for what I do.
    "We're the Sultans of Swing."

  4. #4
    Bubba's Avatar
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    Whatever works for you. Many here are weight and bulk conscious so reducing those two is part of their overall mentality. There are also people who like to tinker and find new and cool ways to do the same thing. Bottom line is if it works, is relatively safe and you don't mind carrying it then that's all that matters.
    Don't let life get in the way of living.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by OldRagFreeze View Post
    For one the line is (presumably) a bit heavier than needed.

    So going back to my newbie question....what kind of line should I be using? I'm using the line that came with my GrandTrunk, which is prusick cord. The original setup had cords through the bag that ended in an S-hooks. These were to be attached to the cord. For weight, I pitched these and ran the line through the hammock.

  6. #6
    craige's Avatar
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    Depending on your weight, most folk use dyneema lines, most commonly either 7/64" or 1/8" amsteel or dynaglide made into either whoopies or ucrs attached to the webbing for weight savings. A lot of folk also just use longer straps and cinch buckles or descender rings. Some use other lines and are happy with them, just gotta experiment and find what works for you.

    Do some research in the suspension section and you will find all your answers and then some!!

    If you are looking for weight savings experiment with a dyneema line and if you want simplicity look into webbing.

    Just my opinion and my limited knowledge... hyoh, and if you are happy with what you are currently using then stick with it.

  7. #7
    kayak karl's Avatar
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    tree huggers and rope. that was all we knew years ago before all the gadgets and gizmos we were just talking about that this weekend at the hang.
    It's not procrastinating, its proactively delaying the implementation of the energy-intensive phase of the project until the enthusiasm factor is at its maximum effectiveness.

  8. #8
    fallkniven's Avatar
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    Personally, I'd rather not carry that much strap. Just enough to wrap around the tree and then small cord to the hammock is a lot less bulk in the pack. Also, I like a piece of metal hardware (dutchware) in my suspension line, acts as a good drip break, stopping the rain from soaking my lines, and running into the hammock with me.

  9. #9
    New Member
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    I found dynaglide at a local marine supplier. It isn't too expensive, its weight rating is fantastic, and you will have a hard time beating the weight. The instructions in this post are easy to follow, and it took me no time to make whoopie slings. If you have watched the videos, then you know how easy it is to set up, but I was really in shock when I first hung with them.

  10. #10
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    I use a similar set up with my big cotton Brazil style hammock. Big cheap rope w/ a truckers hitch, looped directly or through straps to whatever.

    For backpacking it's whoopies and marlin...

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