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  1. #1
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    Thoughts on a 8.5 ft (2.6 m ) tarp.

    Hello hangers,

    A tarp 8.5ft (2.6m) when used for hammock camping hanging on a diagonal making a diamond pattern would give you a 12ft (≈3.7m) ridge line.

    Would this be considered ample for coverage for an 11ft (3.35m) tarp? thoughts please

    Happy hanging!

  2. #2
    Bubba's Avatar
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    I assume you mead an 11 foot hammock? An 11 foot hammock's RL would end up being around 110 inches which would leave 17 inches of tarp extending past each hammock end. That should be enough for most weather. Of course the closer the tarp is to the hammock the better protection. It will also depend on how and where you pitch your tarp.
    Don't let life get in the way of living.

  3. #3
    Caveman's Avatar
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    I agree, it should be ok for most conditions. I've heard good things about the Kelty 9x9 (that's not much bigger)
    If you ain't havin' fun, you're doin' it wrong

  4. #4
    Loki's Avatar
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    Should be great for any 11' or shorter, gathered-end using a SRL. High Winds will blow rain/snow underneath so consider a set of doors, or a water-resistant UQProtector in those conditions. Also, during bad weather, setup leeward of a ridge and perpendicular to prevailing winds if possible. A jacket, piece of Tyvek, etc., might be used to block one end with a little ingenuity
    - Loki,

    "Climb the mountains and get their good tidings.
    Nature's peace will flow into you as sunshine flows into trees.
    The winds will blow their own freshness into you, and the storms their energy,
    while cares will drop away from you like the leaves of Autumn."
    John Muir

  5. #5
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    Cheers for the replies, yes sorry I did mean to type 11ft hammock....

    Sounds like it should be suitable...

    That good I tend to hammock camp in warmer weather and go to ground in the cold. So a tarp around that size should suit me fine for both purposes.

    Thanks a lot.

    Happy hanging!

  6. #6
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    forgive my ignorance but whats the acronym SRL stand for? Standard ridge line?

  7. #7
    Prefers life at 12 MPH. FLRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AquaExp View Post
    forgive my ignorance but whats the acronym SRL stand for? Standard ridge line?
    "Structural Ridge Line"; it means that the ridgeline is designed to take the tension of the suspension when the suspension angle is too low (i.e.: the trees are too far apart or the suspension is set too low on them), in order to ensure that the hammock remains at the same sag angle. This improves comfort for the occupant in suboptimal hang spots.

    Hope it helps!
    "Just prepare what you can and enjoy the rest."
    --Floridahanger

  8. #8
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    It helps a lot. Thank you.

    It doesn't snow were I live actually the temperature never really drops below 17˚C (63˚F). We get loads of rain during the wet-season, around 4 metres and even more in particularly wet years, but this isn't really the ideal time to be out camping anyway and if you do go you choose your dates accordingly and also pitch your hammock and tarp accordingly.

    Thanks again. I am very close to upgrading all my required gear.

    Kindest regards.
    Last edited by AquaExp; 02-01-2013 at 18:32.

  9. #9
    Prefers life at 12 MPH. FLRider's Avatar
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    Not a problem!

    While we don't get quite that much rain here in FL, rain was definitely a factor in my choosing an hammock as my shelter system. My last t**t trip, it dropped ~3 inches (7.5 cm) of rain on me in an hour or so, and I was literally floating on top of a prepared site, praying that the bathtub floor didn't spring a leak.

    I figure that if you have to worry about water coming up through the bottom of the hammock, you've got bigger problems than just getting wet.........
    "Just prepare what you can and enjoy the rest."
    --Floridahanger

  10. #10
    michigandave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Caveman View Post
    I agree, it should be ok for most conditions. I've heard good things about the Kelty 9x9 (that's not much bigger)
    That size should do the trick, but it might be a little iffy if bad weather rolls in. I'm using a kelty 12 and have more than ample coverage, plus options to pull in the ends for stormproofing.

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