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  1. #1
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    Fabric with a high breaking strength?

    I'm looking into the possibilities of making something similar to the Tentsile Stingray (picture attached) but I'm not sure what I would need to use for the floor. I'm more concerned about cost than weight as this would be more of a car camping tent or a tree house for kids.

    I already have some "200D Oxford Nylon" from DIY Gear Supply laying around and that seems to be pretty strong stuff but I'm not sure if would support the weight of 2-3 adults (500-600lbs) as well as the stress from the straps when pulled tight.

    I have no idea what kind of strength fabrics have for this sort of thing, but knowing that the straps are winched to pull it taught that says a fair bit on the amount of tension the fabric will have to endure.

    Any ideas, advice, opinions, whatever would be greatly appreciated.
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  2. #2
    Prefers life at 12 MPH. FLRider's Avatar
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    Looking at that photo, it seems as if they've gone with a semi-bridge style structure. See that dark line in between the hammock beds and along the sides (there's a tiny edge showing in the vicinity of the fellow's feet)? I'm willing to bet that that is some kind of webbing--and you can get polyester webbing that's rated to ~1500 lbs or so fairly easily (DIY Gear Supply and Arrowhead Equipment both carry it, among others). The webbing is taking the majority of the stress from the attachment points, and the fabric bed can be normal ripstop, I should think (though no-stretch polyester might be a good bet rather than ripstop nylon; this thing isn't going to be ultralight, regardless of how you make it).

    Now, mind you, this is from looking at that photo--I've never seen one in person, let alone attempted a DIY construction of one. But, I'm willing to bet that that is how the manufacturer achieved a two-person hammock. It's the simplest way to go about it, for sure. That's probably why the thing is so very long, as well; it allows for more room in the center for a flat lie without crowding the other person in the hammock with you.
    "Just prepare what you can and enjoy the rest."
    --Floridahanger

  3. #3
    Ramblinrev's Avatar
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    The following description is from the http://www.treeztreetents.com/Order.html website.

    Complete basic package: Customized—handbuilt and fit—2.5 oz. Ripstop Nylon Tent w/double doors and three integrated, fully zippable and screen-backed windows, two large, permanent storage pockets plus foot-end storage strap and area and with exterior accessory/gear ties already installed; all permanently installed on web-tensioned, high-strength, low-weight, high-tech, outdoor cloth base; black, anodized Easton tent pole set; our 3:1 Tensioner device w/supporting hardware and lines, 3, 10' Tree-Saver Bands (TSBs) (also expandable) w/single Carabiner; full "Silnyl" Fly/Canopy @ 15+ oz.; custom logo stuff sack.
    That should give you an idea of what the big boys use. Admittedly the "outdoor cloth base" is a bit vague. I think I might go with 500D ballistic nylon or even 1000D if weight is not an issue. But that's just my own paranoia seeping through. How many prototypes do you want to make in development?
    I may be slow... But I sure am gimpy.

    "Bless you child, when you set out to thread a needle don't hold the thread still and fetch the needle up to it; hold the needle still and poke the thread at it; that's the way a woman most always does, but a man always does t'other way."
    Mrs. Loftus to Huck Finn

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  4. #4
    gargoyle's Avatar
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    I wouldnt bother..
    Its cool looking but it would be a nightmare in the rain. Once you seal the doors, condensation would be an issue.

    The rain would also run down the roof and eventually soak into the bed area. Making the bed area waterproof would further enhance the condensation issue.

    Then you'd have to design an uq.

    Cool idea, but not practical, IMHO.

  5. #5
    Ramblinrev's Avatar
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    Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain. I got my wires crossed and read the whole thread wrong. Now.... where are my glasses?
    I may be slow... But I sure am gimpy.

    "Bless you child, when you set out to thread a needle don't hold the thread still and fetch the needle up to it; hold the needle still and poke the thread at it; that's the way a woman most always does, but a man always does t'other way."
    Mrs. Loftus to Huck Finn

    We Don't Sew... We Make Gear! video series

    Important thread injector guidelines especially for Newbies

    Bobbin Tension - A Personal Viewpoint

  6. #6
    Member
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    I guess I should mention that this would be a novelty tent that would be too heavy for normal backpacking at ~15lbs pounds (maybe viable around dangerous animals or with multiple people) but overall, just a "can it be done" project and something for kids and "zombie clubs" to play around with.

    Secondly, I would absolutely add a couple vents to reduce condensation. Breaking this down to it's core, this is a suspended 3 sided dome tent.

    As an update/elaboration, I've added a floor plan with dimensions below...for those who don't want to do the math, it's 18'x18'x18' and the grey is webbing, whereas the colors indicate the fabric patters (different colors indicate a single piece of fabric that runs over top of, and is sewn to, the webbing). I think the webbing would support about any decently heavy duty fabric but I'd rather make a tank than a floppy tent if I'm not going lightweight anyway.

    Costs for everything are a little under $300 for materials (with the 200D oxford at $4/yd).
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    Last edited by jordo_99; 02-01-2013 at 13:43.

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