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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldpappy View Post
    Since you are still planning and doing section hikes, I might suggest you plan your hikes South to North unless you like up hill hiking.
    Reason, Big Meadow to Mathews Arm is all up and down and not critical, but if you hike North during the last 10 miles toward Front Royal you be going more down hill and with the flow of other hikers.
    Your timing seems right - it gets too hot for me starting in June.
    Also, go with the weather forecast more than a calendar date. No need to mention bear safety - just hang your food items.
    Thanks Oldpappy, I was actually starting to think that going South to North might be a good idea. I just have to figure out the logistics of getting to and from wherever it is I decide to set off from. And I am definitely planning to start based on the weather. Fortunately I have some flexibility with my schedule at the moment as far as being able to take time off.

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    Best advice I ever got was while hiking in Peru at high altitude. The Peruvian guide told me "The slower you walk, the faster you'll get there." It's hard but I've tried to heed that advice ever since and have reeped various rewards as a result.

    In the Shennies and the Smokies I always seemed to "average" about 2mph, somtimes a little more.

    Miguel

  3. #23
    Senior Member Gris's Avatar
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    I agree with everybody else on 2mph. I often hike at 3mph but by the time I eat, stop for views and so on it equals 2mph. I plan on hiking the central and northern sections NOBO over five days from 6/1-6/5. I figure if I get on the trail mid morning on 6/1 I should be off the trail no later than the evening of 6/5. If I have good weather and things go well I could be in Front Royal by 6/4. I have always enjoyed hiking with thru hikers and around that time of June I should have plenty of company. One more thing about pace is during the summer I will move a little quicker but stop for water more often God blessed me with open pours so I figure .5 liters of water per hour and plan my breaks around that as best as I can. We all know water is heavy and if I can keep it down to carrying 1.5 liters or less on my back ( especially downhill ) I do it.

  4. #24

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    I actually time myself during my trail runs so I know what a 2, 2.5, and 3 mph pace feels like. My Saturday hike is a 7.5 mile out and back which I do in 2 hours 45 minutes which puts me just above 2.5 mph. I can do 3 mph but only for about an hour and then I'm beat. 2mph feels a bit slow to me. I only do that on steep uphills.

    I find that there's a lot of advantage to being aware of your pace. If it's hot and I'm sweating I can sort of tell "Oh yeah, I'm hiking between 2.5 and 3 mph. I should slow down." The same thing happens when it's raining. I'm aware enough of my pace to try to slow down to avoid sweating when I'm trying to stay dry.

    I also find that there's a huge mental barrier for me to get past after about 4 hours of hiking. I could theoretically do 25 miles in a single 10 hour day. But after 4 or 5 hours of walking, even with a half hour break, I just want to stop. I'm sure that if I trained to do that many hours I'd get use to it. But a 20+ mile day is a long way for me right now. It's one thing to get back to the truck after a 7 mile hike in under 3 hours and feeling great. It's quite another to get back to the truck after 3 hours and 7 miles and then thinking "OK, go do that again. Twice."

  5. #25
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    Re: Average miles per hour on the AT in the SNP?

    Depending on terrain of course, but flatish land with rolling hills I actually average 3.5 by myself... I know it's outside the norm but I have always been a fast walker... That's one reason why when I hike with a group I usually stick to second place... I don't like making people feel slow, or making people go faster than they are comfortable... I have a 26.2 marathon hike coming up this Sunday... So I'm used to going long distances with weight... But it took LOTS of training to get there...
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  6. #26
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    All this talking about how fast to hike is killing me... I just want to get out and hike. I haven't managed to do any hikes longer than 5 miles yet. This weekend was beautiful but I took my dog with me and she pooped out after 3 miles... it was too warm for her.

  7. #27
    Needs more Hang time Catavarie's Avatar
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    I say hike at a pace you feel comfortable with. If you are breathing hard, then slow down. If you are sweating profusely, then slow down. If on the other hand you're getting passed by grandma on her rascal, then speed up.

    If you are wanting to hike to exercise and loose weight, then hike at a vigorous pace that lets you still talk normally. If you are wanting to hike to just get out in the woods, then go at a pace you are comfortable with.

    My hiking speed is around 3.5 mph on the mostly flat trails in my area, which is much faster than my typical strolling around town pace. Something about being in the woods invigorates me. Now if I could quit stopping to look at every little thing I could kill some serious mileage.
    *Heaven best have trees, because I plan to lounge for eternity.

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  8. #28
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    I can average 3-4 depending on motivation. 4 is easy with 35lbs or less. 4mph is a 15min mile and about the average persons walking pace.

  9. #29
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    Re: Average miles per hour on the AT in the SNP?

    Quote Originally Posted by ataris121 View Post
    I can average 3-4 depending on motivation. 4 is easy with 35lbs or less. 4mph is a 15min mile and about the average persons walking pace.
    Snipped from Wikipedia...

    Although walking speeds can vary greatly depending on factors such as height, weight, age, terrain, surface, load, culture, effort, and fitness, the average human walking speed is about 5.0 kilometres per hour (km/h), or about 3.1 miles per hour (mph). Specific studies have found pedestrian walking speeds ranging from 4.51 kilometres per hour (2.80 mph) to 4.75 kilometres per hour (2.95 mph) for older individuals and from 5.32 kilometres per hour (3.31 mph) to 5.43 kilometres per hour (3.37 mph) for younger individuals; [2][3] a brisk walking speed can be around 6.5 kilometres per hour (4.0 mph).
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  10. #30
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    lol I guess my average is from the people I deal with most often, military. Im doing a 10k in <1.5hrs once a week with a 35lb pack over easy terrain. about a 14:15 to 14:30 pace. My pack runs heavy when I hike ~50lbs and i manage 20min/mile 3mph or faster over medium terrain. Nothing beats a 30lb pack 45lbs of body armor and 12lbs of weapon doing 5mph over rugged terrain in 120degree heat to get you in shape for hiking.

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