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  1. #1
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    1.9oz Ripstop ripping

    Hey all, a little while ago I decided to get into the make you own gear and made a hammock out of 2 pieces of 1.9 oz Ripstop and was great, but heavy. Today I go another 4 yrds and look at some of the exta from the last propject and decided to see if 1 piece of 1.9 oz Ripstop would hold me. So far it looks good. Now I sould say that Im not a light person, at about 270lbs, and in the persuit of lighter gear was wondering if making my new hammock out of 1.9 all by it self is a good idea, or sould I add another layer of 1.1 oz Ripstop I got from Thru-Hiker.
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    Hanger Fromally Known as Ghost93.

  2. #2
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    1.9 has held my 220+ self plus 10+ pounds of gear just fine. I am currently using a nylon taffeta that is a lot thinner than 1.9 ripstop.

    Having said that. Something that has held once or even a few times may not hold up for the long term. That is why I am making one out of 1.9 oz for my thru. I do not want to test my hammock to failure. I also hang from places I really do not want to fall from.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

  3. #3
    New Member sparkysko's Avatar
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    What does the tafetta look like? Does it kinda have that ripstop pattern? Some of the commercial manufacturers recommend heavier stuff than 1.9 for above 250lbs. I use stuff that weighs about 1.9 (i think 1.5 - 2.3ish), and I can see my hand through it, and question whether or not it's ripstop (it has the checkboard pattern, but it's slightly different looking than my DWR). So far it's held my 300lbs up for the few times i've used it. It hasn't gained my confidence yet, although I'm not sure what would.

  4. #4
    slowhike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sparkysko View Post
    What does the tafetta look like? Does it kinda have that ripstop pattern? Some of the commercial manufacturers recommend heavier stuff than 1.9 for above 250lbs. I use stuff that weighs about 1.9 (i think 1.5 - 2.3ish), and I can see my hand through it, and question whether or not it's ripstop (it has the checkboard pattern, but it's slightly different looking than my DWR). So far it's held my 300lbs up for the few times i've used it. It hasn't gained my confidence yet, although I'm not sure what would.
    i don't know about the taffeta because i'm not familiar w/ that, so i'll let someone else answer that, but just out of curiosity, how are you determining the weight of the fabric you have?
    are you weighing it & using the formula from ed speer's "hammock camping" book?
    don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!

  5. #5
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    The taffeta I am using does not have the checkerboard patteren. It is a weave similar to cotton. I picked it up at walmart. I think on short summer trips it is the way to go. I can feel a lot of air movement through it when I swing back and forth.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

  6. #6
    New Member sparkysko's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by slowhike View Post
    i don't know about the taffeta because i'm not familiar w/ that, so i'll let someone else answer that, but just out of curiosity, how are you determining the weight of the fabric you have?
    are you weighing it & using the formula from ed speer's "hammock camping" book?
    Never seen the camping book. I measure the length and the width, and use this crappy kitchen scale I have. Most recent stuff I found was 4 ounces for 8'x4' which was 3.5 square yards, so that's 1.1 ounces per square yard. This kitchen scale is really crappy and only weighs up to 1 pound, so when I'm measuring the weight of a bolt of fabric I bought, I rig up a balance scale out of a coat hanger, string, and soda cans full of water. Empty soda cans are 1/2 ounce (15g). This method is also awful.

  7. #7
    New Member sparkysko's Avatar
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    I have done a new-fabric stress test on 1.1oz ripstop vs the 300lb bubba (me). Aside from my whippings slowly slipping off, 1.1oz was enough to hold me up, although the hammock was only 6 feet long ( i cut it for 9 feet, go figure). I bounced around a bit, sat on the edges, and generally abused it. I now feel confident in using 1.9oz fabric. I agree with Hammock Engineer however, who knows how it'll last in the longterm. I just expect to fall, and don't put myself in a bad spot like some of the other crazies on here do. For testing I also hang myself only a few inches off the ground.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by sparkysko View Post
    I have done a new-fabric stress test on 1.1oz ripstop vs the 300lb bubba (me). Aside from my whippings slowly slipping off, 1.1oz was enough to hold me up, although the hammock was only 6 feet long ( i cut it for 9 feet, go figure). I bounced around a bit, sat on the edges, and generally abused it. I now feel confident in using 1.9oz fabric. I agree with Hammock Engineer however, who knows how it'll last in the longterm. I just expect to fall, and don't put myself in a bad spot like some of the other crazies on here do. For testing I also hang myself only a few inches off the ground.

    I resemble that remark.

    I usually do what you did the first time I set up a homemade one. I set up close to the ground, jump around a lot, swing, plop down, set on the edge, and then lay for a while and recover. Probibly a good laugh for the neighbors. I then inspect it for damage. So far only some of the cheap taffeta failed this test where the tieout was. The tieout put a hole in it from the friction between the fabric and the spectra. Everything else was fine with my 220+ self.
    Last edited by Coffee; 03-05-2007 at 11:28.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

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