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  1. #1
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    My Indoor Hang Setup

    Please feel free to critique me as i am new to this. I used all marine grade hardware and 1/2" plywood with 2 inch tapcon screws. The bolt has a large diameter washer on the back side to distribute load more efficiently. I am going to router the edges of the plywood, add a washer and nut to the front to add to the appearance and eliminate any bolt wobble. As well as paint the plywood to match the wall. I did a lot of research on the amount of force that plywood could handle with a "pulling" affect and i believe i am well within the range of safety and then some.

    Any thoughts or comments are welcome. I will update with pictures and posts as i upgrade and enhance this setup.

    I just HAD to have a way to watch tv while in my hammock. Why not, right?

    P.S.
    I caught HELL from my girlfriend for bolting a big a** piece of plywood to the wall. I blame it on you all.

    Thanks,

    Matt














  2. #2
    Aardvark's Avatar
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    For the plywood, get a poster same size, pop hole where bolt is, attach to plywood. Add plexiglass over it, add painted frame around border, now you don't have plywood on the wall, just a picture with a bolt sticking out of it. Semi stealth hang indoors.
    .... the Aardvark (earth pig)... a rather unremarkable creature whose sole claim to fame is that it is the first animal listed in the dictionary.
    Rob

  3. #3
    Brute1100's Avatar
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    What is the other end attached to... Conduit? Steel pipe? I see it looks like mule tape wrapped around it, but don't know what the tape is wrapped around...
    Live, Laugh, Love, if that doesn't work. Load, Aim and Fire, repeat as necessary...

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  4. #4
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    The pipe is a solid steel pole. It is there as a support and bolted into a joist and a cement base. The black wrap is actually a poly tree hugger I just wrapped aroun multiple times. I'm trying to think of a simpler way of attachment to the pole.

    Thanks for the poster/frame suggestion. Good idea.

    Matt

  5. #5
    Gary_R's Avatar
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    I would use a shorter bolt so that one doesn't get bent and I would worry about the loop that's holding your cording, look like it has a pretty rough edge that may fray it over time. I would use something like this instead



    And if you sand and router the plywood and add some stain it will look much better.

  6. #6
    this is how I set up my hammock at home. I used a couple of stronger wood screws in the the corner and door fram. I then used a prussic knot and a caribiner to adjust the height as needed. I also attached an electric blanket as an under quilt and set it on low for the winter.. this has replaced my bed and been amazing!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #7
    Detail Man's Avatar
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    You've done well distributing the load. I agree about using the d-ring mount. The single bolt, while it might not pull thru, will either bend the washer on the back, or will itself bend if you add the washer and nut to the front as you mentioned. The d-ring can be attached with carriage bolts from the back, will self-adjust to your hang angle, and be safer for the whoopie.

    You mentioned using tapcons, a masonry anchor. Is the wall cinder block or poured concrete? If masonry, did you check the thickness of the furring strips the drywall is attached to? If 3/4" furring strips + 1/2" drywall +1/2" plywood, then 2" tapcon is too short. DON'T HANG!

    If 2x4s were used then tapcons aren't necessary. Regular screws would work. Just make sure you hit the studs. 2" anchors into studs seems a little short. 2 1/2" would be better.

  8. #8
    Gary_R's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Detail Man View Post
    You've done well distributing the load. I agree about using the d-ring mount. The single bolt, while it might not pull thru, will either bend the washer on the back, or will itself bend if you add the washer and nut to the front as you mentioned. The d-ring can be attached with carriage bolts from the back, will self-adjust to your hang angle, and be safer for the whoopie.
    Easier yet, use a couple T nuts on the back side. Then you can put the bolt in through the front and remove it anytime without taking the whole assembly apart. They are plenty strong enough. You want the mounts tight, especially when using plywood. Movement over time will weaken the plywood and chew its way through..

  9. #9
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    Just so you know...because the plywood has some degree of flex (combined with it's long length) almost all of the force is on the two center tapcons. The corner tapcons won't have a significant load unless the center gives a bit. You're probably good, but keep an eye on the center for any signs of the tapcons pulling or more likely, the heads pulling through the plywood. An ~1/8" of movement in the center will transfer most of the load to the corners so catastrophic failure isn't of much concern.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Detail Man View Post
    You've done well distributing the load. I agree about using the d-ring mount. The single bolt, while it might not pull thru, will either bend the washer on the back, or will itself bend if you add the washer and nut to the front as you mentioned. The d-ring can be attached with carriage bolts from the back, will self-adjust to your hang angle, and be safer for the whoopie.

    You mentioned using tapcons, a masonry anchor. Is the wall cinder block or poured concrete? If masonry, did you check the thickness of the furring strips the drywall is attached to? If 3/4" furring strips + 1/2" drywall +1/2" plywood, then 2" tapcon is too short. DON'T HANG!

    If 2x4s were used then tapcons aren't necessary. Regular screws would work. Just make sure you hit the studs. 2" anchors into studs seems a little short. 2 1/2" would be better.
    I rethought my approach and added a 600lb ring to the bolt instead of just the bare metal on whoopie. It ended up cutting through the whoopie. That was a funny thing to watch.

    The wall is poured concrete block. The screws are counter sunk 1/8 inch and so i am looking at a little over 1.5inches of "bite".


    Quote Originally Posted by Gary_R View Post
    I would use a shorter bolt so that one doesn't get bent and I would worry about the loop that's holding your cording, look like it has a pretty rough edge that may fray it over time.

    And if you sand and router the plywood and add some stain it will look much better.
    I was able to find and use a smaller bolt. The wood is routered and i plan on wood filling and painting the same color as the wall.

    Quote Originally Posted by gmcttr View Post
    Just so you know...because the plywood has some degree of flex (combined with it's long length) almost all of the force is on the two center tapcons. The corner tapcons won't have a significant load unless the center gives a bit. You're probably good, but keep an eye on the center for any signs of the tapcons pulling or more likely, the heads pulling through the plywood. An ~1/8" of movement in the center will transfer most of the load to the corners so catastrophic failure isn't of much concern.

    Do you think it would be beneficial to add six more screws in between the existing screws?

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