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Thread: DAM vs. UQ?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Big D's Avatar
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    DAM vs. UQ?

    I have been thinking about hammocking in wet environments.
    Can an argument be made supporting a DAM as a better choice for bottom insulation over a long hike? Weight is an issue, but I feel it would be more versatile over the long haul.

    I have recently purchased both a DAM and a Snugfit, and I can see advantages to both. What do you think?
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  2. #2
    slowhike's Avatar
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    I actually use both together in cold weather & I'm as sung as a bug in a rug!
    I haven't tried the DAM alone in very cold weather... maybe 40s, but it spreads my speer type, DIY hammock just enough that if I lay on my back & strait, I still have a little space between me & the walls of the hammock, were my quilt can maintain it's loft... but not much.
    If it's going to be very chili, I personally like to have something on the sides (underquilt or SPE) so I can move around as I like, sleeping on my side w/ legs pulled up, or whatever, w/o feeling the cold air against the sides of the hammock.
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    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
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    Too heavy for me!

    You really don't need to be paranoid about wet weather and an underquilt IMO, just cautious. I can only think of a couple of times my quilts have gotten wet and they were my fault for not paying attention or being lazy and paying the price.

    Now, if you're considering taking it in case you want to go to ground , that's another story and it would be more comfortable than the shelter deck.
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    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cannibal View Post
    Too heavy for me!

    You really don't need to be paranoid about wet weather and an underquilt IMO, just cautious. I can only think of a couple of times my quilts have gotten wet and they were my fault for not paying attention or being lazy and paying the price.

    Now, if you're considering taking it in case you want to go to ground , that's another story and it would be more comfortable than the shelter deck.
    And that was a Climashield quilt, if memory serves. How did that work out, with a wet UQ? Clearly you survived and keep going back for more!
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

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    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyBob58 View Post
    And that was a Climashield quilt, if memory serves. How did that work out, with a wet UQ? Clearly you survived and keep going back for more!
    I actually had to dump standing water (about 6") out of that UQ, then climb into bed for the night. Gooch Mtn. Shelter; I'll never forget that one. That night was the exception in the fact that my down top quilt didn't get wet; probably the only thing that let me sleep that night. Worst morning on the trail. The other times was usually due to lazy packing; not sealing everything up all nice.

    Even so, when I switched out to the smaller MacCat Standard tarp I never noticed any 'splash' effect on my quilt in the morning after a storm. I'm sure there was some, but doubt it would have any substantial effect on the quilt's performance. JMO.
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    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cannibal View Post
    I actually had to dump standing water (about 6") out of that UQ, then climb into bed for the night. Gooch Mtn. Shelter; I'll never forget that one. That night was the exception in the fact that my down top quilt didn't get wet; probably the only thing that let me sleep that night. .
    Man, that sounds pretty darn bad! So, did your back freeze that night? Did it take long to dry out?
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

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    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyBob58 View Post
    Man, that sounds pretty darn bad! So, did your back freeze that night? Did it take long to dry out?
    I don't think the insulation got very wet, the shell did it's job. The larger problem was the fact that the hammock body itself was wet. I tried to dry it with my Pack Towel, then I put my fleece on (supposed to insulate when wet) followed by a stiff upper lip and climbed in for a rotten night.

    When I unzipped the quilt in the morning and felt the insulation is was bone dry, so if it got damp my body heat dried it by morning.

    I also left my boots out in the open that night. It was not a good night, nor morning.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cannibal View Post
    I don't think the insulation got very wet, the shell did it's job. The larger problem was the fact that the hammock body itself was wet. I tried to dry it with my Pack Towel, then I put my fleece on (supposed to insulate when wet) followed by a stiff upper lip and climbed in for a rotten night.

    When I unzipped the quilt in the morning and felt the insulation is was bone dry, so if it got damp my body heat dried it by morning.

    I also left my boots out in the open that night. It was not a good night, nor morning.
    Without nights/days like that you wouldn't appreciate those mornings when the sun was bright, the birds were singing, and the views were inspiring. ... or at least that is what I always told myself, well that and these puds are just training for Katahdin.
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    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
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    In very moist weather, the down inside the DAM will begin to lose loft as well. Especially if the down is damp and it's cold outside. That's why they say to avoid blowing into them. You'll still have a pad, just with less efficient insulation. Still more resistant than an underquilt, probably...but not completely immune to water or moisture.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Just Jeff View Post
    In very moist weather, the down inside the DAM will begin to lose loft as well. Especially if the down is damp and it's cold outside. That's why they say to avoid blowing into them. You'll still have a pad, just with less efficient insulation. Still more resistant than an underquilt, probably...but not completely immune to water or moisture.
    Jeff, I understand you don't manually blow DAMs up, that you use a pump sack to avoid the moisture from you breath. But that is the first I heard about the down getting damp because of the outside air that you use to inflate it containing moisture in humid conditions. It makes sense and something I always wondered about, just don't remember hearing that before.

    Do you recon that the 'cold to the bone' that we sometimes experience in cold humid conditions is due in part to our basic insulation being compromised by moisture penetration?
    Youngblood AT2000

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