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  1. #21
    Member maggot's Avatar
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    Depending on where you typically hang, maybe a couple ft of seatbelt type webbing. Just enough to get you 3/4 around the tree.

    I'm new to this but I use 12ft of 1" webbing on either end, tie it to a carabiner that's about 4" long from the hammock. Pack size is important but not critical, and I don't care about weight much as I never hike but motorcycle camp.

  2. #22
    Member Jungle Jim's Avatar
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    Maggot

    Of course, the other great thing about a hammock and tarp is how quickly you can have a comfortable bed on the road. If webbing suspension works for you then good on ya'. HYOH.

    Being fat, old and lazy I want to keep it light for my backpacking adventures. Grams become ounces, ounces become pounds and pounds become pain!

    Jungle Jim

  3. #23
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    I'm not sure how it would work but has anyone tried a winch rope type cordura chafe guard. May work to protect the tree as well as protect the amsteel or whatever you're using. The rope goes through the guard so it i always there.

  4. #24
    Member Jungle Jim's Avatar
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    JT

    I don't think a chafe guard would spread the force evenly enough to protect the tree. It would also be heavier than the 1" webbing that many people use.

    Jungle Jim

  5. #25
    Senior Member DemostiX's Avatar
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    You're making it too hard, JJ

    Jungle Jim: Strapping is already optimized for tensile strength in the direction of the load. The warp threads are strong, and the weft just stabilizes. Polyester is just so strong, with strength, holding layout constant, roughly proportional to weight. How strong is that? About 1/3rd the strength of Dyneema cord of the same weight.

    So, your optimization will be from not having straps that are too long or too strong. Some folks already use composite straps to reduce weight and bulk, part of the strap consisting of Dyneema cord which will not come in contact with the tree. Well, not until you come on the unexpected situation that there are no trees to hang from smaller than 3' / 1M diameter ones, and your straps, composite or not, are just 6' / 2M long. In that situation you set up with a dummy load in the hmmk, and place found lots of found sticks under the the portions of cord in contact with the sides of the tree(s).

  6. #26
    Member Jungle Jim's Avatar
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    Demostix

    Like I said, the trees I hang from are no less than 6" and no more than 12". Yes, there are places I go where trees are bigger or smaller but I don't hang there. Also, if I ever did go someplace where trees were bigger, it wouldn't take much to include some longer tumplines.

    As for the orientation of the fibers, you are absolutely right; using fabric "tumplines" is inefficient because the load is being carried by only half the fibers. I would like to find some ultra-light Spectra or polyester webbing 6" wide and 0.001" thick but I haven't so far, so I will play with what I do have - which is still in transit as I type this. I have considered using some kevlar or spectra tape from the composites industry but I don't think it would hold up well since it is meant to be used in a resin matrix.

    And yes, I am making this MUCH more complicated than it has to be.....but its FUN to consider the possibilities! HYOH.

    Jungle Jim

  7. #27
    Senior Member DemostiX's Avatar
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    Hip, hip, hooray for three mules

    Or two or three strips of 3/4" mule tape in parallel. That's the stuff that is likely ideal, once it is cleaned of lubricant.

    If I thought there was sufficient demand for Dyneema (tm) tree straps, I'd have commissioned them for production and resale. And, so, too would several other regular dealers before me who likely looked into it. <smile>

    So, at a weight penalty of twice Dyneema's weight, mule tape, thin and optimized for tensile strength, may be the best thing.

  8. #28
    New Member
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    Just a thought: would 1 or 2" strips of cuben fiber cloth (fibers in load direction) make tree friendly, light and strong tree straps?

  9. #29
    Member Jungle Jim's Avatar
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    Demostix

    What is the weight of 3/4" mule tape per foot? I'm not sure how multiple strips would be for distributing the weight evenly across the back of the tree. Also, I am under the impression it is rather stiff, making it something of a challenge to fold and sew, if that's what you have in mind.

    Hanginhawk

    All the Cuben fiber laminate I've seen has had fiber reinforcement in either two directions or four directions. They may make unidirectional Cuben fiber tape and THAT might be interesting. Otherwise, my impression is that you would likely be using one of the heavier Cuben fiber cloths (1 oz or heavier) to get any sort of durability, but it's worth looking into for sure.

    Jungle Jim

  10. #30
    Senior Member DemostiX's Avatar
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    No, mule tape is not especially stiff, not what I've handled.

    You don't want cuben. Repeat: DON"T WANT CUBEN. It is a reinforced film, and the film is fragile, not to be abraded, however strong the Dyneema reinforcement. Straight Dyneema, or Dyneema on less-expensive polyester weft for stability, (maybe.)

    Dyneema does get woven into straps, for climbers. Too thick, too strong, too narrow, and too expensive. Go by the name "cordelette" and "sling" and more. Mammut and Black Diamond are among the brands

    A little search will turn up custom webbing and strap makers. Many fibers, including Dyneema (tm).

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