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  1. #21
    gcy24's Avatar
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    Couple of questions... What is r-value? And are these ccf pads better than an inflatable pad? Or is that kind of an opinion thing..
    Grant

    Getting lost is not a waste of time.

  2. #22
    Senior Member Superfluous Grizzly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gcy24 View Post
    What is r-value?
    Here and here are a couple good threads discussing R-Value.
    In lamens terms, the higher the R-Value, the warmer you are. For example, an R-Value of 1 would be suitable for summer camping but you would probably need an R-Value of 3 to use it for three season camping. Personally, I have used a pad with a rating of 1.3 (Klymit Static V) down to the teens in a 15f rated down bag with no real issues. That being said, R-Value does vary based on the user, but not significantly. If you are camping in -20f then you will need at least an R-Value of 5-6.

    Quote Originally Posted by gcy24 View Post
    And are these ccf pads better than an inflatable pad? Or is that kind of an opinion thing..
    A little bit of both actually. CCF versus Inflatable is definitely opinion based. However, a CCF will never lose its insulating properties due to loss of air. I have personally had the displeasure of letting an ember burn through my inflatable pad, and I didn't pack a patch kit. That was a sad...cold.... learning experience.
    While I had this experience, I still do believe inflatable pads to be far superior (and yes I've come a long way from my blue foam ccf). I've tried to NeoAir, Exped line and Montbell. I'm content with the Klymit Static V for 3-season.
    So why do I think inflatable pads are better?
    - Relative to R-Value (warmth), the elite inflatables are much lighter. They are generally thicker, which is what makes them more comfortable to lay on after a hard day of hiking. They are more compact to pack. You can use them as a frame in a frameless pack (which is what I do).

    I ALWAYS carry a patch kit now.... and they do a stellar job in a pinch.

    Sorry for my long-winded nature.
    Cheers.
    Here... take this. It won't save your life, but it may help you save your own.

  3. #23
    sturgeon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gcy24 View Post
    Couple of questions... What is r-value? And are these ccf pads better than an inflatable pad? Or is that kind of an opinion thing..
    Ha I'm too slow. Superfluous Grizzly beat me to it...but I'll let you read my rambling post anyway...

    R value measures the heat transmission through a substance, so basically how well the pad insulates you from the cold ground (as most of these are designed for ground dwellers). Higher numbers are better.

    For closed cell foam ccf ....Basically the thicker the closed cell foam, the warmer you will be. Some have coatings to reflect more heat back to you, and egg carton indentations to trap air pockets, all to beef up the r value. They can be cut to size, and shaped to fit your hammock. You can glue them together to make wings to wrap around your shoulders. You can layer them, etc...pretty versatile.They are light and relatively cheap, but take up a lot of space. Some find them less comfy than inflatable pads. Ridgerest Solar pad can get you up to R 3.5, a pretty respectable number

    Inflatables are much more expensive and heavier, but usually offer higher R values. Some even have down inside them to bump the rating up for winter camping.
    They are usually more comfy than ccf pads. But you have to carry a repair kit and be careful of punctures and sparks. And you have to blow them up.
    The X-therm by Thermarest has an r value of 5.7, so it's currently the king of the hill for inflatable pads that don't have down in them. Ones with down can get up to R 8 or higher

    For hammocking, problems are pad slipping under you, and pad not wide enough. Solutions are double layer hammocks where u can slide the pad in between to hold it in place, putting silicon on your pad to stop sliding, crossing two pads t-shaped at the shoulders to insulate your shoulders, and gluing wings on your pad at the shoulders.

    Hope that helps
    Last edited by sturgeon; 04-03-2013 at 22:05. Reason: too slow

  4. #24
    gcy24's Avatar
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    Well thank you two. A wall of information but every bit useful. I guess I need to try sleeping in mine and see what works best for me, everytime I have slept in my hammocks, I have only had a sleeping bag.
    Grant

    Getting lost is not a waste of time.

  5. #25
    Senior Member Superfluous Grizzly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gcy24 View Post
    Well thank you two. A wall of information but every bit useful. I guess I need to try sleeping in mine and see what works best for me, everytime I have slept in my hammocks, I have only had a sleeping bag.
    If you have the cash, get an underquilt and pretend pads dont exist. I use pads because im a hybrid between ground and hammock. Hammock when im solo and tarp tent with the woman.
    Here... take this. It won't save your life, but it may help you save your own.

  6. #26
    sturgeon's Avatar
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    Hike your own hike. I found underquilts in gathered end hammocks to be a pain in the butt. Slipping off the shoulder, air gaps, ridge near my head, tightening up and enclosing the hammock etc. A lot of fuss until you get it right.

    A nice thin flexible pad with side extensions put into a double layer hammock opens up the hammock, blocks the wind, and just works every time without fuss, and can be comfy if cut well and flexible. Can also be used on the ground, and as a seat, kneeling pad in a canoe, etc...I think quilts are not for everyone, even if everyone could afford one.

    (that said, quilts fit well on bridge hammocks, and when it does fit, it's lovely)

  7. #27
    Senior Member Superfluous Grizzly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sturgeon View Post
    Hike your own hike. I found underquilts in gathered end hammocks to be a pain in the butt. Slipping off the shoulder, air gaps, ridge near my head, tightening up and enclosing the hammock etc. A lot of fuss until you get it right.

    A nice thin flexible pad with side extensions put into a double layer hammock opens up the hammock, blocks the wind, and just works every time without fuss, and can be comfy if cut well and flexible. Can also be used on the ground, and as a seat, kneeling pad in a canoe, etc...I think quilts are not for everyone, even if everyone could afford one.

    (that said, quilts fit well on bridge hammocks, and when it does fit, it's lovely)
    Well said. I hated my UQ until I got the fit just right. It did take quite a bit of modification
    also. Since I have found that sweet spot, I feel that I have to adjust less than my pad. Getting out in your hammock and finding what works for you is the important thing.
    Here... take this. It won't save your life, but it may help you save your own.

  8. #28
    Downhill Trucker's Avatar
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    Another Wal Mart pad???

    Well, I trimmed the pad down to fit my torso...
    ImageUploadedByTapatalk1365448092.241140.jpg
    Weighs in at 12.4 oz. 4oz lighter than my blue pad with wings. It also fits great in my frameless pack. I'm going for an overnight this Saturday and it should get into the low 40s, hopefully lower. We shall see how it goes.

  9. #29
    New Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Downhill Trucker View Post
    How was your shoulder coverage?
    Have not been by the forum in a while. I did not have any problems with shoulder squeeze, CBS or cold shoulders. I'm a side sleeper.

    I got the pad because it said the second layer prohibits mold and bacteria. Something like that. I trimmed two inches off the end, slid it into the BMBH sleeve and sowed the sleeve closed. No plans of removing it. Ready to hang right out of the dry bag. When breaking camp, I just roll the whole thing up and shove it back into the bag.

    I'll be using this setup while camping from the boat, quad or base camping.

  10. #30
    Randy's Avatar
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    I have this pad and love it.
    It is wider that the blue pads, does not slide around like the blue pads and the inflatable pads. It works great in my Hennessy and ENO dl and in my diy double layer. ...so far this pad is at the top of my list. It is kinda light weight for a Pound Hawg though....
    Last edited by Randy; 04-14-2013 at 10:34. Reason: spellin
    "Proud Pound Hawg"
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