Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Senior Member Northern Mike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    French River, Ontario
    Hammock
    ENO DN
    Tarp
    Poly
    Insulation
    Winter fat
    Posts
    114

    The Cadillac of Hammocks design and feature ideas

    All I can think of to describe what I'm designing is the Cadillac of hammocks.

    Long story short, I'm looking to to design a hammock for cool weather, but also for many nights stay in the same location.
    I camp a lot during the spring and fall. I also have a few 5+ day trips which would see me leaving the hammock setup for some time in the same spot.
    Weight for this hammock is not a huge factor as I'll be travelling via boat (kayak/canoe) or hopping off a train in the middle of no where.

    So far I'm looking at incorporating an (thermal reflective) insulated layer into the hammock itself. This will provide warmth, but not have to worry about a pad or similar moving around on me.
    I'll include two tarps, one with a thermal reflective layer (for cool weather) and one without. This should help reduce the sleeping bag or quilt weight/size.
    A built in head and toe bag (box?) will be a must.

    What would more experienced hangers consider incorporating into their hammock if weight wasn't an issue (within reason of course)?

  2. #2
    Loki's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Western, NC
    Hammock
    WB, JRB, WL
    Tarp
    How's the weather?
    Insulation
    JRB, UGQ, WL
    Suspension
    Strap'BinerWhoopie
    Posts
    1,712
    Images
    50
    Well, since you are not worried about weight...

    A hammock with a thin layer of 'summer' insulation might be a neato idea as long as condensation is not an issue. Easy enough to add an underquilt when the weather cools. You're already planning footbox so maybe a removable mosquito net, ridgeline and a small gear organizer for it too? I have often wished my hammocks had two or three small loops attached along both sides - just in case I wanted to use them for snugging my quilts, etc.

    Good luck on your quest!
    - Loki,

    "Climb the mountains and get their good tidings.
    Nature's peace will flow into you as sunshine flows into trees.
    The winds will blow their own freshness into you, and the storms their energy,
    while cares will drop away from you like the leaves of Autumn."
    John Muir

  3. #3
    Bubba's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Hammock
    WBBB 1.7 SL
    Tarp
    WB Superfly
    Insulation
    WB and UGQ
    Suspension
    Whoopies or Straps
    Posts
    5,355
    Images
    57
    I'd inculde some convenient way to store gear in the hammock. I personally like the shelf on the Warbonnet Blackbird. The saddle bags on the Ridgerunner seem good as well. I like the idea of storing stuff off to the side vs a ridgeline organizer.
    Don't let life get in the way of living.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Northern Mike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    French River, Ontario
    Hammock
    ENO DN
    Tarp
    Poly
    Insulation
    Winter fat
    Posts
    114
    Quote Originally Posted by Loki View Post
    Well, since you are not worried about weight...

    A hammock with a thin layer of 'summer' insulation might be a neato idea as long as condensation is not an issue. Easy enough to add an underquilt when the weather cools. You're already planning footbox so maybe a removable mosquito net, ridgeline and a small gear organizer for it too? I have often wished my hammocks had two or three small loops attached along both sides - just in case I wanted to use them for snugging my quilts, etc.

    Good luck on your quest!
    Sorry, should have mentioned the bug net, it's a must up here during the warmer months. Removable would be nice, but I'm wondering if it will be a pain with gear hanging off the sides. I'm thinking of a few small (light utility) pockets along the inside and some gear hooks (for shoes, maybe cloths for the morning, etc) would be a great idea.
    I don't think condensation should be an issue, but I'll find out. The thermal reflective material I'm using is a woven material that is breathable (same or similar stuff to what is used in high end winter jackets). I truely hope condensation with this stuff is a non-issue as that would make my new cold weather hiking sleeping bag a complete failure.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bubba View Post
    I'd inculde some convenient way to store gear in the hammock. I personally like the shelf on the Warbonnet Blackbird. The saddle bags on the Ridgerunner seem good as well. I like the idea of storing stuff off to the side vs a ridgeline organizer.
    I'll have to look into that shelf on the Warbonnet Blackbird. Was thinking ridgeline bags.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Hatfield, MA
    Hammock
    DIY 1.1 single-layer
    Tarp
    SOL Escape Bivvy &
    Insulation
    DIY JCP underquilt
    Suspension
    DIY Whoopie slings
    Posts
    467
    Images
    68
    pockets! loops - inside and out for securing gear, insulation, clothing! a fan! a hydration bladder pocket! LED lights! a pocket near my head for my ipod! another fan! (June - August in Virginia is NOT rational hammocking season!)

  6. #6
    The weight of a heat reflective tarp will probably add more weight to your setup than you'd be able to save in increased efficiency, especially considering a tarp is not a closed system, heat can flow in and out on the breeze etc. i doubt you'd notice much added warmth from it and probably not enough to enable any real weight savings on your sleeping bag. i think you'll find that "real" insulation works better than thermal reflective "insulation", which is usually more of a gimmick, case in point: a closed cell foam pad is many times more effective than a windshield reflector even though the foam doesn't reflect any heat
    Last edited by warbonnetguy; 04-10-2013 at 17:57.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    North Brunswick, nj
    Hammock
    Attempting a DIY Bridge
    Tarp
    DiY Cat Cut
    Suspension
    Whoopies
    Posts
    354
    I used omni tape for the bug net. Softer then velcro and makes it easily removable when not needed.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Mouseskowitz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Chicago land
    Hammock
    DIY 1.5 DBL
    Tarp
    DIY cat cut hex
    Insulation
    PLTQ & DIY 20 UQ
    Suspension
    Whoopie slings
    Posts
    775
    Check out the hammock a friend of mine made. It has two shelves, dual internal organizers and interchangeable zippered bug net, fleece and ripstop covers.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •