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  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    Dangerbird and Backpacking?

    How does the Dangerbird work for backpacking use?

    Is it too heavy?

  2. #2
    Member
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    Jul 2012
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    Minneapolis, MN
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    WBBB DBL 1.7, Lite owl
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    Potomac, Jarbidge
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    You can customize a dangerbird for as light as 22.4 oz or as heavy as 67.9 oz. I used their hammock calculator to come up with those numbers. It's your individual decision what's to heavy or what's light enough

  3. #3
    Bubba's Avatar
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    May 2010
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    Ontario, Canada
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    Are you an ultralighter?
    Don't let life get in the way of living.

  4. #4
    ^shane^'s Avatar
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    Apr 2009
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    Arlington, TX
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    I just carried my Dangerbird 11' x 68" single layer crinkle taffeta hammock for the 28 miles of the Eagle Rock Loop. No issues. It's not the lightest hammock I own, but it's not so heavy that I won't carry it backpacking. Worth its weight in comfort.

    "One of the best things you can do in this world is take a nap in the woods." ~ Jayber Crow by Wendell Berry

    "While it may be a lot of work, the view is best from the summit." ~ an anonymous staff member of Philmont Scout Ranch

    Enjoy the day
    Shane

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bubba View Post
    Are you an ultralighter?
    No, as long as it weighs less than my tent, I'm good.

    I'm widening my search for another hammock. Since I'm an Ohio native, I'm very partial to things from the Buckeye state.
    :-)

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by ^shane^ View Post
    I just carried my Dangerbird 11' x 68" single layer crinkle taffeta hammock for the 28 miles of the Eagle Rock Loop. No issues. It's not the lightest hammock I own, but it's not so heavy that I won't carry it backpacking. Worth its weight in comfort.

    How did you determine the width you need?

    I'm also a bit confused on the overcover, inside, and outside options. The overcover makes sense, but I'm unsure about inside and outside options. Am I right to presume that's only an option when its a double layer?

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Peoria, Illinois
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    DB72, DIY tablecloth, Kammok
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    I use a DangerBird 72 single layer. Yes, it is heavier than some hammocks, but make sure you are comparing apples to apples. The integrated bug net/top cover saves the weight/bulk of a separate system (and is a lot less hassle IMHO). If you don't want an overcover, you could look at the Darien to save some weight.

    Mine is a single layer 2.6 oz polyester taffeta, which I think is more comfortable than ripstop nylon. I agree with ^shane^ that a couple oz is worth the more comfortable lay. I've brought it on 5 trips so far and never regretted it.

    Either way, PapaSmurf makes quality products and is great to work with.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jun 2012
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    Peoria, Illinois
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    You're right about the inside/outside options - it only applies to double layered hammocks.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
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    When someone says Dangerbird 72 -- does that mean it's 72 inches wide?

    sorry for asking the newbie questions, I really don't know and would like to know.

  10. #10
    ^shane^'s Avatar
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    Apr 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by dchrismer View Post
    How did you determine the width you need?

    I'm also a bit confused on the overcover, inside, and outside options. The overcover makes sense, but I'm unsure about inside and outside options. Am I right to presume that's only an option when its a double layer?
    I guessed on the width... When I order my next hammock from PapaSmurf, I'll order it 60" wide... although at 68" I can get REALLY diagonal and REALLY flat. Woke up early last Sunday in a fetal position on my right side laying across the hammock. Incubator wasn't wide enough so I was cold at shoulders and feet. Otherwise I might not have woken til morning.

    Hammock body is up to you. I wanted to try the criinkle taffeta. I'll go with 1.1 or 1.9 single layer nylon next time to save some weight.

    On the covers, I suggest having PapaSmurf put THREE zipper pulls on each side of each cover. This gives you the ability to enter/exit from either side using either cover. Not a lot of weight penalty involved.
    "One of the best things you can do in this world is take a nap in the woods." ~ Jayber Crow by Wendell Berry

    "While it may be a lot of work, the view is best from the summit." ~ an anonymous staff member of Philmont Scout Ranch

    Enjoy the day
    Shane

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