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  1. #1
    New Member corey's Avatar
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    Which width for the straps?

    Hi,

    I have 50 mm and 20 mm wide straps here and now I ask myself which width should I use for tree hugger straps for my hammock?
    Which width do you use?
    Which width is enough?
    Which width is too much?

    corey

  2. #2

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    While you could probably use either of those, most of the straps I've seen have been in the 1" range. Assuming that the materials you're looking at have similar load ratings, it's basically up to whatever you want to carry with you.

  3. #3
    craige's Avatar
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    Re: Which width for the straps?

    Surely you can never have too much?

    Most people use 25mm straps.

    What breaking strain are the 20mm straps?

    If you are quite light then the 20mm will probably be ok but if not then you should go with the 50mm to save the risk of tree damage and also because the 25mm straps that many vendors sell are 1500lb bs.

  4. #4
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    Re: Which width for the straps?

    Seems like 25mm is a standard... But I don't see why 20mm wouldn't work as long as they are strong enough... In which case I would default to the 50mm
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  5. #5
    gunner76's Avatar
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    And make sure to use polyester, not nylon (nylon stretches)
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  6. #6
    New Member corey's Avatar
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    I just made two 10 foot (3m) straps with the 50 mm PP. They are kind of bulky and they weigh 0,5 lbs (207 g) which seems to be a bit to much because I like to carry a light backpack.
    Maybe I should make another pair in 20 mm or a combined pair with 3" (1 m) 50 mm and 7" (2 m) 20 mm sewn together.

    By the way the 20 mm straps are rated to hold 400 lbs (200 kg), so this should not be problem.

  7. #7
    craige's Avatar
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    Re: Which width for the straps?

    Be careful, most people will recommend AT LEAST an allowance of 5 to one (bs to user weight) i.e. dynaglide has a bs of 1000lb and it is recommended that anyone over 200lb shouldn't use it as hammock suspension.

    Remember you are a dynamic weight when in the hammock...

  8. #8
    Senior Member Mouseskowitz's Avatar
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    When looking at weight ratings you need to know if it is the working load limit or break strength. As craige said you want to take your break strength and divide by 5 to get you working load limit. So, if the break strength of the 20mm stuff is 200kg the working load would be 40kg.

    If you have thin stuff that is strong enough you can combine it with a piece of 50mm long enough to protect the tree. This post has good info on sowing webbing.

    Your other option would be to use a short section of 50mm, long enough to get around your average tree. Then use whoopie slings from there to your hammock. That is contingent on being able to find the correct type of rope to make them. You want UHMW polyethylene which a quick search says is around by you.

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