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  1. #1
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    fulltime sleeper hammocks

    Hi, My name is adam, I'm new to the forum. I'm glad there are so many like minded individuals here. I've been sleeping in a Grand Trunk Double (originally purchased for camping) for about a month and 1/2 now, and its okay. I like it better than my bed, but after reading about so many different kinds of hammocks it seems a poor choice for a full-time sleeper. The grand trunk breaths well, however i fear sleeping in it as stretched it out. I've tried to re hang it at different angles to see if i can loosen it up any (i've got it about at about a 9 foot spread, 10.5 being its total length), none are comfortable, and tend to be awkward. I then rehung it at my regular length, and tried laying across is the opposite way i tend too, and it's strainful. It doesn't want to lay down straight like the other side does.

    So my point being, its not a very good full time sleeper. I've heard great things about Mayan, and Brazilian, but without having tried either one, I have hesitations purchasing one without knowing how it feels. As far as i'm concern, a $200-$300 hammock, is nothing compared to a $500+ bed. I'm just looking for something with longevity. Im looking for people sleepfull time in either for some help in my purchase.

  2. #2
    Senior Member hutzelbein's Avatar
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    You can get a good Brazilian for ~100 USD. I believe it's the Mayans which are expensive.

    Personally, I like the WL Night Owl enough to permanently sleep in it. Another alternative would be to go with one of the more sturdy models BIAS offers (e.g. the Camper XL).

    If you go with a camping hammock instead of a Brazilian or the likes, I would definitely go with a heavier double layer fabric since it provides a more comfortable lay (in my opinion). It's also less likely that it will permanently stretch.

    Maybe also look at a bridge hammock. Either buy or DIY. DIY would have the advantage that you could use a nicer fabric like heavy cotton/linnen/hemp.

  3. #3
    samsara's Avatar
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    A brazilian of some sort is probably going to be your most comfortable bet and there are some decent ones to be had for less than $100. There are plenty of mayans for the same price but, while a mayan may be incredibly comfy, a mayan is probably going to be too cold for a good portion of the year (it would help reduce your a/c bill in the summer though).

    I think you should shoot for a bigger hammock of any type for your everyday hammock because size (and especially length) is going to translate into comfort. I slept for 6 months in an ENO DN and it was very comfortable. I ended up making a brazilian tablecloth hammock after Knotty posted about doing his and it is worlds more comfortable. It's a great hammock and I added the mini-spreader bars to maximize the comfort. I highly recommend it because you can do that hammock for about $25 if you want to keep it minimal, $40 if you go all out (and buy all new materials and hardware for hanging it). Ticket To The Moon has some interesting bignormous hammocks that I would consider if I didn't already have such a comfortable hammock (and too many hammocks in general ) and they are reasonably priced. I'm also a big fan of the parachute fabric, it's the only thing I miss from my ENO DN days.

    My own personal recommendation would be to get away from the camping/backpacking hammocks because those are generally trying to minimize the size/weight and that's probably going to come at the expense of comfort (which is fine if you're trying to make it small, light, or cheap to buy). Since you won't be packing this one go big and go comfortable.

    That's my $.02, I've been sleeping full time for almost a year (about 5-6 months in an ENO DN and 5 in a DIY 90x156 polyester tablecloth brazilian) and love it.

    Dave
    "Laying and swaying in a hammock is like a steady morphine drip without the risk of renal failure" - Dale Gribble

    The Florida Hangers Facebook page and the Florida Hangers web page

  4. #4
    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
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    Get a Brazilian for less than $200 and sleep well.

    The majority of Brazilians can be had for under $200. I'm talking quality hammocks for that money. The one I've been sleeping in at home (primarily) is a 5 year old Brazilian that cost about $120. Fantastic hammock and is in as good of shape now as when I got it.

    Mayans, unless you get into the artisan market, are generally the less expensive large hammock option. Yes, you can spend $1,000 on one that a 'starving' artist handcrafted, but I wouldn't. Most of the Mayans that are considered good are somewhere between $100-$400. The tighter the weave, the higher the cost and the comfort. "Thick Cord" Mayans are more marketing that substance, but they are better than the generic low-end Mayans that are sub $100. Good for the backyard, not so much for the bedroom.

    The Nicaraguans can run the full length of the field in terms of quality and comfort. The most comfortable hammock I ever had the privilege to lay in was a Nic. I suffered some sticker-shock when I saw the price tag and walked away from it. In hindsight, I regret that and have been unable to find that hammock since. That was about 4 years ago and I haven't stopped looking. I should have bought it right then and there...dangit! I don't mind hanging around the backyard in a cheap Mayan. In fact, that's where you're most likely to find me on a weekday evening. However, I do not like the cheap Nics at all. Can't tell you any scientific reason, just don't like the cheap Nics for anything. If you go Nic, spend some $$$$ and go big. Maybe you'll find the hammock I'm desperately seeking. If you do, you better let me know.

    With both the Nics and the Mayans I would generally suggest looking at models above the $200 price mark. I've got models in both styles that were closer to $100 and are very comfortable, but the only ones to give my Brazilians a run for their money are the ones that range above $200. One thing to consider, and I speak from personal experience on this, is that both the Nics and the Mayans are open weave. That handy little design feature is wonderful at catching toes as you exit the hammock. Be forced to exit quickly from a dead sleep....and let's just say you'll learn some new dance moves.

    My home hammock, more weeks than not, is the Bossa Nova. Genuine Draft sleeps mostly in a Jewel. I have no affinity for the shops in those links. They were just at the top of the search window....I'm lazy, sue me.
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  5. #5
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    Daily sleep hammock advice

    Adam:
    I slept daily in a Mayan hammock (from Hayneedle.com) made from cotton for a year then switched to an Eno Doublenest which I have used for 3 years. The Mayan hammock was really comfortable, but the one I had stretched at the hip and ankle area during the summer. I’m 6’6” and 220 so if your are lighter maybe this wouldn’t be an issue. Alternatively, there may be Mayan or Nicaraguan hammocks made with better quality material (linen?) than the one I originally purchased. One word of caution, if you have limited space for hanging a hammock then be careful when considering a Mayan as mine required 13.5 feet between suspension points… however, I had an XXL Mayan because of my height.

    The comment by Dave that Mayan hammocks sleep cool is spot on. If you do decide to go with a Mayan, but like to sleep with the windows open when it’s cool out - you can stay warm by using a quilt underneath the hammock, or getting a large sleeping (e.g., Big Agnes) to put around your hammock *or yourself) like a cocoon. I used an old quilt to make an underquilt for my Eno’s Doublenest – this didn’t require any special DIY skills. Wrapping up in a queen- or king-sized microfleece blanket is also a great way to stay comfortable through the night. I’ve got a light microfleece for summer, and a heavier microfleece for colder weather.

    I’ve learned that using a pillow under my knees as well as another pillow under my calves makes sleeping in a hammock easier. If you like cooler temperatures you might consider an Exped air pillow. They are pricey, but I like mine to prop my head and stay cool.

    I suspend my hammock using D-rings now. That let me donate my hammock stand to a friend. During the day I store my hammock by hanging it on one wall which creates a lot of space.

    Finally, you might want to check out Youtube video’s regarding bridge hammocks. Many of them are from members of the forum. They look and sound like a superior design, especially for a daily sleep hammock. I haven’t seen a commercial model for tall guys unfortunately, but if you are a regular size you may find a suitable option.

    Good choice in deciding to try hammock sleeping. The only problem you’ll have in the future is when you travel and have to sleep in a bed again (if only hotel rooms were equipped with suspension points)!
    Last edited by DrTom; 05-15-2013 at 15:22. Reason: wanted to put additional info for Adam

  6. #6
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    Thank you all for your comments. It nice to hear some real world experience. I should have mentioned it earlier, but I'm not exactly a big guy, just about 5'11 and 170 lbs. you all have helped me tremendously in my search for a new full time sleeper. Now I just need to do a little research

  7. #7
    Senior Member hutzelbein's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cannibal View Post
    The Nicaraguans can run the full length of the field in terms of quality and comfort. The most comfortable hammock I ever had the privilege to lay in was a Nic.
    @ Cannibal: What differentiates a Nicaraguan from other hammocks? I tried a Google picture search: do they use spreader bars?

  8. #8
    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hutzelbein View Post
    What differentiates a Nicaraguan from other hammocks? I tried a Google picture search: do they use spreader bars?
    In generalities:

    The Nics are usually longer in length, but because the weave differs slightly and they use a heavier and softer string, the Nics don't expand as much as the Mayans. I've seen it described as being more "springy" than a Mayan. Not sure that's exactly right, but it's a good description. The weave on the Nics really doesn't open very much, so my toes are less at risk of getting snagged. They tend to be warmer than a Mayan because of the heavier string and tighter weave.

    The pictures you are probably seeing are on retail sites. Yes? Most of them will put a wide pillow in the hammock to make it look spread, but there are some Nics that come with spreader bars. Some come with fixed spreader bars, some are optional, and some leave them out completely. Many variations on Nics, so it boils down to what you want. My preference runs sans spreader bar.

    You can spend some serious money on a good Nicaraguan hammock and you probably won't regret it.
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