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Thread: Trip safety

  1. #1
    Senior Member HamMike's Avatar
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    Trip safety

    Just a reminder to be careful this weekend on your hikes. Many are excited to get out and let their guard down. This is an article in the news today showing just how easy it is to find yourself in trouble.

    http://www.mydaytondailynews.com/new...ondaily_launch
    "He who makes a beast of himself, gets rid of the pain of being a man." Dr. Hunter S. Thompson

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    MAD777's Avatar
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    Trip safety

    Very sad, but thanks for reminding us to be careful. Nature is beautiful, but must be respected. The law of gravity can be a harsh one.
    Mike
    "Life is a Project!"

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    Doctari's Avatar
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    We who go into the woods sometimes forget that what we do can be dangerous!
    There were quite a few times at RRG last time where we saw a few side trails to views that if you had hurried & not been careful, the trail ended at the edge of a hidden but very tall cliff. Just a moments inattention & you could fall for a very long time.
    Saturday night, just as it was getting dark, we heard a (what sounded like) HUGE tree fall in the valley below! Scary!
    Thursday, one of us nearly stepped on a poisonous snake while setting up camp.
    Friday, there was a bit of lightning!

    Not once was I frightened, these events are indeed to be expected and are an added aspect to hiking. But be aware that: There are nasty critters out there that can kill you. The weather is neither evil or good, it also don't care if you are in the way,,, or not. Trees do fall in the woods, BIG trees fall in the woods! It's not the fall from the cliff that kills you, it's that sudden stop at the end. And, for those (me too) that hike in areas, like RRG with caves & rock houses (or cliffs) those rocks you are walking on under the cave or cliff or rock house, used to be up on the cliff, cave or rock house.

    Don't stay home! Just be aware & alert!!

    I remember an old ad, something like:
    You could get eaten by a bear & die.
    You could fall from a cliff & die.
    You could get bit by a snake & die, OR:
    You could sit on the couch, watching TV & die!

    Personally I'll pass on the couch, & probably so should you!
    When you have a backpack on, no matter where you are, you’re home.
    PAIN is INEVITABLE. MISERY is OPTIONAL.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Slo's Avatar
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    I spent all of highschool climbing all over those cliffs down there. Not technical climbing but foolin' around on those rock faces. You have to have great situational awareness off trail down there. There are even some spots though, on trail, over in the wildlife preserve side, that pucker me right up.

    You're walking on the trail and you're right on the edge of a 100'+ cliff and it's not a sharp edge, it's more rounded. Those are the worst because it's harder to tell where they "oh crap" area is. I'm always ultra-conservative around those areas, but these stories are EXACTLY why.

    I've noticed a huge up-tick in how many people are going out down there anymore as well. It's PACKED, PACKED every weekend and the VAST majority don't appear to be regular hikers. Most don't have water or any kind of pack, even waist packs. Noticed an uptick in incidents like this from year to year too.
    "I ain't here for a long time, I'm here for a good time"

    - George Strait

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    STinGa's Avatar
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    That is sad news

    I always try to have someone double check my stuff, whether it is a report going up to my boss or my gear before I go over the edge.

    I had a co-worker who stepped of the rooftop without letting his supervisor checking his harness. Luckily the ground was saturated due to multiple days of heavy rain … he left a depression in the muddy ground (funny now since it looked like something out of a cartoon) … he only had minor injuries.

    My dad has told me a story about a training exercise for a night time patrol when he was at Ft. Benning years ago. When the squad came to a halt, the hot headed squad leader ran up to the front to hassle the point guy about meeting a deadline. The squad leader ran right off a ledge and fell about 15 feet. He broke either his ankle or leg, I can't remember

    And then again, sometimes bad things just happen. Gravity is a given, Mother Nature can be unforgiving, etc. It is sad to hear about anyone getting hurt like that.

    STinGa
    Sarcasm is a dying art.

    Eagle Scout September '85 Troop 339 Smyrna, TN

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    Sounds like he was lowering a pack of climbing gear after using it so he had a harness and rope and some kind of anchor so why didn't he tie off before starting to lower the gear???? It's those so basic they don't seem worth bothering things that bite you!
    YMMV

    HYOH

    Free advice worth what you paid for it. ;-)

  7. #7
    Senior Member HamMike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slo View Post
    I spent all of highschool climbing all over those cliffs down there. Not technical climbing but foolin' around on those rock faces. You have to have great situational awareness off trail down there. There are even some spots though, on trail, over in the wildlife preserve side, that pucker me right up.

    You're walking on the trail and you're right on the edge of a 100'+ cliff and it's not a sharp edge, it's more rounded. Those are the worst because it's harder to tell where they "oh crap" area is. I'm always ultra-conservative around those areas, but these stories are EXACTLY why.

    I've noticed a huge up-tick in how many people are going out down there anymore as well. It's PACKED, PACKED every weekend and the VAST majority don't appear to be regular hikers. Most don't have water or any kind of pack, even waist packs. Noticed an uptick in incidents like this from year to year too.
    From the other side of the gorge looking over at the staircase area to the left of the staircase is where folks seem to congregate. Watchin that looks like someone is about to plunge to their death at any moment. Pucker up for sure watchin those folks. Rooster's point is another heeby jeeby spot.
    "He who makes a beast of himself, gets rid of the pain of being a man." Dr. Hunter S. Thompson

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    This article, appearing in the April 2012 issue of the Conservationists, in which the author notes that the three most dangerous words uttered by outdoor adventurers are "I am just..."

    …going for a day hike/ going to run ahead/ going to scout for deer sign/ going to do some fishing at the lake. These simple words can quickly lead to trouble, landing you in a dangerous situation where Mother Nature tests you and even threatens your life.

    According to wilderness safety expert Peter Kummerfeldt, those three words "I am just…" are the most dangerous words uttered in the outdoors.

    According to Kummerfeldt, "Survival is the ability and desire to stay alive, all alone, under adverse conditions, until rescued. Those who are prepared will usually survive an emergency, while those who are not, probably won't." Preparation and the ability to save yourself are two of the most important topics taught in Peter's class.

    It may seem obvious, but Peter emphasizes that you have a much better chance of survival if you simply prepare beforehand. He explains how a few simple rules and essential pieces of survival gear can turn a life-threatening situation into a survivable (and even somewhat comfortable) night in the woods.

    Rule number one is to carry a survival kit with you at all times. A survival kit does no good if it is in your vehicle at the trailhead or in your pack back at your campsite while you are exploring. You should also make sure your kit is lightweight and compact (see pg. 23 for survival kit contents.). If it is heavy and bulky, you are more likely to leave it behind. If you don't always carry a pack, buy or make a carry case for the survival kit to attach to your belt.

    Another important tip is to always let someone know about your plans. No one is going to look for you unless they know you are missing, so leave a detailed trip plan with someone reliable every time you head out to hike, hunt, camp, fish, bike, etc. The trip plan should include detailed information on your planned route (give GPS coordinates if you know them), possible side trips you might take, date and time you will be returning, who is going with you, the make, color and plate number of your vehicle, the color of your tent, and your cell phone number. Ask that person to check that you got home safely when you said you would. And by all means, if you do get into trouble, stay put! Search and rescue becomes much more difficult if you stray from your planned itinerary.
    Full Article can be read here: Help Me Make it Through the Night -- Surviving a wilderness emergency

  9. #9
    Doctari's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HamMike View Post
    From the other side of the gorge looking over at the staircase area to the left of the staircase is where folks seem to congregate. Watchin that looks like someone is about to plunge to their death at any moment. Pucker up for sure watchin those folks. Rooster's point is another heeby jeeby spot.
    Yea, and that is a L O N G fall. My friend Matt & I took a log out of the OHM Dome (someone put it IN the dome, weighed about 65 Lbs.) & tossed it off the cliff so it couldn't be put back. "Ready set throw: 5, 4, 3, 2 ,1 , , , UM, , , 5, 4, 3, 2, CRASH. OH!"
    I figure you would have time to have a heart attack on the way down.
    When you have a backpack on, no matter where you are, you’re home.
    PAIN is INEVITABLE. MISERY is OPTIONAL.

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