Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 34

Thread: My big fear

  1. #21
    Senior Member lazy river road's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Hammock
    Warbonnet
    Tarp
    HG/BWWD/Z-Packs
    Insulation
    Hammock Gear
    Suspension
    Woopies & Straps
    Posts
    3,239
    Images
    152
    The best advice I have to offer is Trust your gut, trust your instincts what ever happens don't panic and stay calm and most importantly have fun. Worrying about the things that can go wrong make us think about how we can stay safe so I say worry on and keep safe but don't let the worries overcome you to a point where it prevents you from doing what we all love to do and that is sleep in the trees.
    Sometimes I like to hike and think, And sometimes I just like to hike.

    Hiking is'ent about waiting for the storm to pass its about learning to hike in the rain.

  2. #22
    Senior Member OneThing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northern California
    Hammock
    HH EUA-sym
    Tarp
    MaCat Deluxe
    Insulation
    HG 20 Phoenix
    Suspension
    UCR, Dutchware
    Posts
    544
    Quote Originally Posted by adventuregirl View Post
    I actually find I feel better if I have someone else with me who is more scared than me and then I go into Mamma Bear Protection mode and be brave for their sake. The friend I am going with is just as tough as me, if not slightly tougher, which makes me more worrisome. I am not afraid of storms in fact I love them..... So I will be fine its just the letting go of the tent I think, which is strange because after my first night in a hammock I swore I would never sleep on the ground again. I have yet to go on a trip where other was not a tent to crawl intoif I needed too.... Not that I have needed to....... But essentially one day I hope to hike the Appalachian Trail, and won't bring a tent, so I got to let go..... And this trip will prove that I can do it.
    Fear is based on lost of control/No Control over a situation. Having to be the Mamma Bear, gives you back some of that control. It's a weird way we learn to cope as humans. (I should add, that it's not really a bad way to cope. We all have to do what we have to do to get us through the scary crap in life)

    I've been using a hammock almost full time (365 days a year) since 2003. I still at times love setting up my tent & laying on Terra firma. One of these days I might get a hammock tent. The best of both worlds...
    Last edited by OneThing; 05-29-2013 at 19:46. Reason: Clarification
    _________________
    It is better to say, "This One Thing I do" than to say, "These forty things I dabble in." - Washington Gladden


    OneThingAT - Facebook
    OneThing YouTube
    N. Calif. Boggs Mt Hangout - May 10-12, 2013

  3. #23
    SilvrSurfr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Jersey Shore, NJ
    Hammock
    BIAS Hiker Lite
    Tarp
    HG Winter Palace
    Insulation
    HG!
    Suspension
    Whoopie/Dutchbling
    Posts
    5,050
    Images
    1
    I was in my garage once, with the door open, watching a beautiful thunderstorm. Suddenly a bolt of lightning came straight down maybe 30 or 40 ft from me. I had never been that close to a lightning strike and was in awe. It was the most awesome thing I had ever seen.

    Of course, the lightning bolt split our massive oak tree in half, then went through the front porch and directly hit my dog and her puppies laying underneath. It was not a pretty sight - they never knew what hit them.

    Your odds of getting hit by lightning in a given year are somewhere between one in 280,000 and one in one million. The odds of a tree falling on you are probably considerably greater, maybe one in 1,000.

    I like this guy's approach to reducing risk:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/29/sc...isks.html?_r=0

    Pay attention to the risks you can control rather than the ones you can't control.

  4. #24
    Brian Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Tacoma WA
    Hammock
    Clark NX-250
    Tarp
    Clark Vertex
    Insulation
    UGQ HDGD FLUQ + TQ
    Suspension
    Whoopies
    Posts
    194
    Images
    19
    I am a brand newb to hanging and share the same concern as the OP. When mountaineering I always checked weather and avalanche forecasts before leaving, and had a backup or would scrub. I knew what cloud formations to look for and other weather indicators if on the lee side of the range. I tested the snowpack for the slope exposure I would be on. I looked for rockfall, deadfall, and other potential hazards I knew to look for. When camping below timberline in a tent I wasn't as concerned about falling branches because there had to be enough space between the trees to pitch my tent so I could see a ways up into the crown and there is a little less exposure.

    I will be heading out with experienced hangers who can help me learn what to look for for awhile though.

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Western North Carolina
    Hammock
    1.9 DL Switchback
    Tarp
    AHE Toxaway
    Insulation
    Underground Quilts
    Suspension
    Straps n Rings
    Posts
    102
    You could get weather radio and beat an honorable retreat if you thought it was going to get too nasty for you.

  6. #26
    BillyBob58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Tupelo, MS
    Posts
    8,465
    Images
    353
    Quote Originally Posted by adventuregirl View Post
    I am getting ready for a real hammocking trip. It is real because me and my friend will not bring a tent as back up. I have spent the night in my hammock in the woods, in the cold, in the rain. I feel confident that I have a set up that works. Here is my fear.... What if really severe winds happen and my tree gets blown over? What if a big branch falls on me? I know to look for widow makers, but I have seen straight line winds knock out big live branches. I am going to go to North Manitou Island which is in the middle of Lake Michigan. I have personally been to this island when there were gale force winds. I set up my tent in an open field with a tarp as a wind breaker. We were fine. The next morning met up with another hiker who had a tree branch fall on his tent. I was glad I stayed away from trees that night. Also what if my tree gets struck by lightning? When you are North Manitou Island you do not have a car close by. You only leave the island by the ferry or a really expensive coast guard rescue. I know that I am ready to leave the tent at home, but what if?
    Your concerns are completely valid. The biggest risk, or at least what concerns me most if camping under trees, is large branches or entire trees fallin, storm or no storm.

    Quote Originally Posted by Whatknot View Post
    Can't you take a pad in case you go to ground? Pitch with walking poles at foot and head to make a low ridge tent with hammock and tarp both attached.
    That is the key right there. I an always prepared to go to ground, Though the last time I did was twice on my 1st trip over 6 years ago.

    Quote Originally Posted by Trudge View Post
    Falling tree or heavy branch will take you out in a tent as well. .....
    This is absolutely true, there is no difference. But I know that what you (OP) are thinking is valid, because I have had the same thoughts: with your tent you would just get away from the trees out in the meadow. Once I was camped up in the Rockies in a place where there were so many widow makers that it was impossible to set up out of reach of one. I couldn't help but remember my little 4 season tent that was so easy to set up in meadows, as there was a meadow close by, as is often the case up there. But, you just need to be fully competent at using your tarp/hammock as a bivy on the ground. It won't be as nice as a tent, but if you set it up really low and stake it out well and weight with rocks, it should hold. Also, you might be able to find some extra protection/wind break for your tarp in the form of small trees/fallen trees/rocks and still be out of the range of the big trees and branches.

    Also, keep in mind BillyBob's hammock rule #1: I always choose the smallest trees that will hold me off the ground, as far away from big trees as possible. Which usually adds some challenge, and often ends up less than perfect. But I always try hard to do that to the best of my ability. If things are going to fall on you, smaller is better.

    Quote Originally Posted by gargoyle View Post
    Plenty of safer locations back from Lake Michigan. If the weather gets really bad, no one is safe. Choose your site with the predicted weather in mind. Most of the birch trees are rotted, so stay clear of them.
    Have fun!
    Yep, protected site as best you can, and always be ready to go to ground if you are worried danger from above is high.

    Quote Originally Posted by SilvrSurfr View Post
    I was in my garage once, with the door open, watching a beautiful thunderstorm. Suddenly a bolt of lightning came straight down maybe 30 or 40 ft from me. I had never been that close to a lightning strike and was in awe. It was the most awesome thing I had ever seen.

    Of course, the lightning bolt split our massive oak tree in half, then went through the front porch and directly hit my dog and her puppies laying underneath. It was not a pretty sight - they never knew what hit them. ...................
    That is horrible, SS! Lightening came into my living room, bored a hole through the slab about the size of a quarter and started a fire one morning about 0430. Much was ruined, but neither man nor beast was hurt.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  7. #27
    WV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    southeast WV
    Hammock
    DIY
    Posts
    3,689
    Images
    204
    Quote Originally Posted by BillyBob58 View Post

    Also, keep in mind BillyBob's hammock rule #1: I always choose the smallest trees that will hold me off the ground, as far away from big trees as possible. Which usually adds some challenge, and often ends up less than perfect. But I always try hard to do that to the best of my ability. If things are going to fall on you, smaller is better.
    This is probably the best concrete suggestion you'll receive.

    You're asking the right questions. Ask each one once, consider the possible answers, and move on.

    Have a good trip. If things really don't look right, don't go.

  8. #28
    Senior Member OneThing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northern California
    Hammock
    HH EUA-sym
    Tarp
    MaCat Deluxe
    Insulation
    HG 20 Phoenix
    Suspension
    UCR, Dutchware
    Posts
    544
    Quote Originally Posted by SilvrSurfr View Post

    Your odds of getting hit by lightning in a given year are somewhere between one in 280,000 and one in one million.
    I remember reading about Ranger Roy Sullivan, who was hit 7 times by lighting during his career.

    Ranger Roy Sullivan

    Wow!
    _________________
    It is better to say, "This One Thing I do" than to say, "These forty things I dabble in." - Washington Gladden


    OneThingAT - Facebook
    OneThing YouTube
    N. Calif. Boggs Mt Hangout - May 10-12, 2013

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Hammock
    WL Lt Owl
    Tarp
    HG Cuben fiber
    Insulation
    Burrow/Incubator
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    263
    It wouldn't be an adventure if we knew the outcome at the outset. Breathe in, breathe out, move forward.

    Good luck.
    Last edited by OCDave; 05-30-2013 at 08:51. Reason: spelling

  10. #30
    Prefers life at 12 MPH. FLRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Gainesville, FL
    Hammock
    DIY Gathered End
    Tarp
    DIY Asym
    Insulation
    DIY Modular Quilt
    Suspension
    Whoopies/MSH
    Posts
    4,017
    Images
    14
    Risk assessment is, quite possibly, the most important safety tool for anything in life, let alone being out on your own in the wilds. Plan for what you can, and always keep the "STOP" acronym in mind: Stop, Think, Observe, and Plan before you act. Good observational skills and an unwillingness to panic are the two best habits to have in the wilderness.

    On the other hand, if it turns out that it's your time, all the planning and safety precautions in the world aren't going to save you. There's a fairly famous quote from (if memory serves) Suzuki Roshi: "Live each day as if you were going to live forever and as if you knew you were going to die tomorrow." Like a lot of Zen philosophy, you can argue the meaning 'till your face turns blue, but I take it to mean that you should plan for what you can and then live as hard as you can, 'cause you never know.

    Be safe and have a fun trip.
    "Just prepare what you can and enjoy the rest."
    --Floridahanger

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •