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  1. #1
    New Member Lastczarnian's Avatar
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    Using 5mm climbing rope for a suspension

    I replaced the original line on my ENO Doublenest with 5mm climbing rope and left a 5' on each side to tie off to my tree straps. I used the 5mm Mamut power rope because it was softer and easier to tie than the stock line.

    Anyone with more experience see a problem with this setup?

  2. #2
    Old Gorge Rat Hawk-eye's Avatar
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    Well it's nylon and will stretch on you as you lay there. You might be scrubbing the ground by morning. Climbing webbing and rope is designed to stretch so it can absorb impacts from falls. Not good for hanging your hammock from. Best to avoid nylon webbing or ropes ...

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  3. #3
    Senior Member jbrescue's Avatar
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    I agree about the stretch in ropes. However, it rigged where the webbing is close to the tree and the suspension is attached without much extra webbing, the stretch will be minimal. If you use webbing and have a long length of it away from the tree, you will have a lot of stretch.

  4. #4
    Thread Injector hk2001's Avatar
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    I agree with hawk-eye.

    If its nylon rope, it will stretch quite a bit. Any Dynamic / climbing rope will.. By design.

    Nylon can stretch up to 30% apparently. I've never seen that much myself, but I think that # will vary from rope to rope

  5. #5
    Womble's Avatar
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    Using 5mm climbing rope for a suspension

    The Mammut rope is a static rope with very little stretch (max 5% elastic elongation after pretension). Dynamic ropes are used by lead climbers and have stretch to 'soften' a fall (up to 40 % of EE).

    But 5% EE is still more than the 0.5 to 1% of Amsteel. Climbing ropes are not build to hold loads without stretch so they are good for climbing, not so good for hanging.

  6. #6
    Like Womble said, its a static rope - little to no stretch.
    Mammut 5mm cord is rated at 5.5kn Impact force (dynamic loading), which is just over 500kg.. id say you are safe with the 5mm.

    Note: im using 4mm climbing cord as 6" extensions from the hammock body to a set of ring buckles for webbing and haven't experienced any stretch or slippages, at all, yet.

  7. #7
    Ramblinrev's Avatar
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    5mm seems really thin to be an active climbing rope. I usually see 8-12 mm if I remember correctly. I don't know the mammut line but assuming it is a static rope you should be ok as long as the SWL is within tolerances.

    Another problem with nylon is it has a very good stretch memory which means it springs back to original length when unloaded. Again, very good for dynamic purposes but it means it will never "stretch out". So whatever stretch you experience one time will occur over and over again until catastrophic failure. Nylon rope is subject to internal overheating from repeated stretching even as a static rope. The Coast Guard discontinued using nylon tow ropes decades ago because of rope explosions from over heating. I'm not suggesting your suspension will explode but there are reasons climbing ropes should be replaced after sever events. Polyethylene ropes do not have the same characteristics, but are never used for climbing for that reason.
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  8. #8
    swankfly's Avatar
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    Yup

    I purchased some 4mm 'climbing" rope from REI. It is PMI cordage. I planned to use it as a ridgeline for a large kitchen tarp. I am really disappointed. No matter how hard I pull, I cannot get it tight enough to keep from stretching and sagging. I always end up retying, because after a couple of adjustments i have bottomed out the truckers hitch. They had it labeled as polyester. After a little research turns out it nylon over nylon. Back to NE staysetx for me.

  9. #9
    Senior Member jbrescue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by swankfly View Post
    I purchased some 4mm 'climbing" rope from REI. It is PMI cordage. I planned to use it as a ridgeline for a large kitchen tarp. I am really disappointed. No matter how hard I pull, I cannot get it tight enough to keep from stretching and sagging. I always end up retying, because after a couple of adjustments i have bottomed out the truckers hitch. They had it labeled as polyester. After a little research turns out it nylon over nylon. Back to NE staysetx for me.
    You will be hard pressed to get a trucker's hitch tight enough anyhow. You would be better off using a taut line hitch or a small prussic to tighten the line.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Ramblinrev View Post
    5mm seems really thin to be an active climbing rope. I usually see 8-12 mm if I remember correctly. I don't know the mammut line but assuming it is a static rope you should be ok as long as the SWL is within tolerances........
    FYI everyone, in climbing terms 7mm and under are generally called climbing CORD, not rope. These are used for prussic's, holding/organizing gear, as emergency belts, and even replacing shoelaces etc.

    8-10mm is used in dual/twin rope climbing, and 11mm plus used for single rope systems including lead climbing.

    (I climb and trust anything over 3mm to hold my static weight, and anything over 10mm for climbing & leading - dynamic falls)

    Swankfly - try using a main climbing brand cord - mammut, dmm, allcord, beal etc..

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