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  1. #1
    Senior Member litetrek's Avatar
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    Insulation ideas

    Who can give me some good suggestions for keeping warm in my new Clark tx-250? I'm thinking of a 20 degree top quilt and some sort of an underquilt or pad? I generally don't go out hiking in weather below 20 degrees at night. A 20 degree sleeping bag will usually work year round here in the southeast. That's my only data point. I really have no idea where to begin for a hammock. I have a couple of criteria: a) 20 degree b) lightweight and not too bulky.. I'm a lightweight long distance hiker c) not a zillion dollars ... Just spent a half zillion on the new hammock. I could go around 200 for the top quilt, and maybe get by with a pad or something for the bottom. I have the new rei insulated lightweight air mattress ...maybe that would work well. I also have the old standby ridge rest. Anyhow comments and ideas on a system would be greatly appreciated.
    Last edited by litetrek; 08-25-2013 at 20:04.

  2. #2
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    I used to us a ridgerest pad and a self inflating pad together. That combo took me into single digit temps no problem. But using a pad does eliminate some of the benefits of sleeping in a hammock. I use an underquilt now and find it much more comfortable. The cost can be a factor. I used the pad combo for several years before I took the plunge on an underquilt.

  3. #3
    Senior Member litetrek's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info. I realize that this topic has been gone over and over and I probably shouldn't have asked about it.

    Over and under quilts seem like the best solution if you don't mind the hefty cost After spending about 400 on the hammock its just too much to run out and spend big again a few weeks later. I've been reviewing the DIY top quilts and going over how I would make one. I can sew so maybe I could save some dough by doing that.

  4. #4
    You should Invest in a quality under quilt.
    Then try to diy top quilt or blankets.
    It is more difficult to get unders to fit correctly.
    Top quilts are easy to fit.

  5. #5
    Senior Member mattyg's Avatar
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    underquilts.com sells shells that you fill yourself then sew shut for fairly cheap

  6. #6
    Senior Member litetrek's Avatar
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    Thanks. underquilts.com looks like a good option for me. I'm not real into the one olive drab color choice but for the price I could live with it. I was also thinking of a light weight fabric ... maybe they would let me customize it.

    I've been looking for some good step by step instructions for a down top quilt. I've found a few very good instructions but they were custom made by people who were shorter and thinner than me. Length is easy to scale up, but I'm not so sure how to scale up width. If anyone has thoughts on widths please let me know. It seems that 48, 50 or 55 inches at the wide end are common.

  7. #7
    Senior Member litetrek's Avatar
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    How does a 3/4 length underquilt work to keep you warm? It seems like it would leave you feet and/or head without insulation below. On the ground the sleeping bag isn't compressed as much in those areas, but with a top quilt that's not really true for your head. I guess the foot box would insulate your feet and lower legs if it was long enough.

  8. #8
    If you want to do it yourself then buy some ago
    from dutch are gear and buy some down from someone else.

  9. #9
    Senior Member litetrek's Avatar
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    Not following that last suggestion. It looks like some of it got cut out.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Gordzilla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by litetrek View Post
    How does a 3/4 length underquilt work to keep you warm? It seems like it would leave you feet and/or head without insulation below. On the ground the sleeping bag isn't compressed as much in those areas, but with a top quilt that's not really true for your head. I guess the foot box would insulate your feet and lower legs if it was long enough.
    A 3/4 length will cover from neck to somewhere around the knees or more depending on how tall you are. Mine goes to the top of my calf muscles. During the warmer months the foot box of my top quilt is more than enough for me. In the colder month I use a small sheet of radiantex which works very well for me. In mid winter I use two pieces. I should mention winter for me never get's much below 10F so... I know others use small pieces of ccf pads or small inflatables like a sit pad.
    The same goes for my head. Nothing during the warmer months, a pillow or tuque, or some such head wear during the winter.
    I chose the 3/4 length for pack volume which is only mildly negated with the radiantex but when I don't need it, pays off for me. I have never yet felt regret for my choice nor the need for a full length quilt, but In colder climes I could see the benefits of full length.
    Embarassing is being the last item in a discount bin.

    No matter where you go, it will never be as cool as it was just before you got there. So thanks for ruining it for everyone.

    Swing looooow, sweet Waaaarbonnet, comin for..to..carry..... me....yawn.....home......zzzzzzzz

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