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  1. #1
    Senior Member Nest's Avatar
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    First time overnight

    Went camping last night in a hammock for the first time. I had my ENO singlenest with a homemade underblanket, the 9x9 "Neo tarp", and a poncho liner as a blanket. Talked my mom into going and she slept in my Hammock Bliss mosquito hammock. She didn't believe me about the cold and only brought a blanket. Around 12 she had to sleep in the car. I was comfortable all night and the Ranger said it got into the 40's. My attachments from the underblanket to the hammock broke on one side, and I got cold on that side though. I will use elastic to attach them so there will be some give next time. Other than that my setup got me down to the 40's, and I can go lower with the addition of a pad in the underblanket, mylar blanket, or other insulation. I feel that I could realistically get into the low 30's with what I have on hand. We did look kind of funny because the tent sites were closed for repairs. So we were in the middle of 30'-50' long RVs and campers in the RV section. Got a lot of funny looks from the RV types. The Ranger said it was the first time anyone used hammocks at that park, and they were really impressed with my setup. That made me feel good. Will post pictures as soon as they are put on disk so people can give advice and see my underblanket. Only cost me $30 to make, so it may help someone make their own.

    My first time hanging for more than 10 minutes. I am convinced it is the way to go, and my mom said that it was the most comfortable sleep she ever had. She did get in it again in the morning and we slept all day. Will definately take a hammock for my AT thru hike next year.

  2. #2
    slowhike's Avatar
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    yep... people find it hard to believe that it can be so much colder in the mountains when they're sitting at home <g>.
    don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!

  3. #3
    Senior Member Nest's Avatar
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    Yeah, she was fine on top. She just underestimated the heat loss from the bottom. She still says it is the best way to camp, just needs an underquilt like mine.

  4. #4
    Senior Member lvleph's Avatar
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    A lot of people mention that hammocking will cost more weight, but if one is using a tent there is no way. So I am surprised that not more tenters have come over to the hanging side. I am a die hard gram weeny, but I also feel that the benefits of hammocking outweigh (forgive the pun) the additional weight.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Nest's Avatar
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    I could carry less weight if I went with a tent, but that's because of cost. I couldn't afford a silnylon tarp, so I went with the gear uide tarp. I can't afford a down blanket so I went with a poncho liner, and I can't afford an underquilt so I made my own. They do weigh more, but I saved a whole lot of money. That money can go towards my thru hike. I would rather save money and carry more weight than spend a lot of money on lightweight gear and can't afford to thru hike. Overall, my hammock, slap straps, poncho liner, underblanket, tarp, rope, and tent stakes cost me about $150.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cerberus View Post
    I could carry less weight if I went with a tent, but that's because of cost. I couldn't afford a silnylon tarp, so I went with the gear uide tarp. I can't afford a down blanket so I went with a poncho liner, and I can't afford an underquilt so I made my own. They do weigh more, but I saved a whole lot of money. That money can go towards my thru hike. I would rather save money and carry more weight than spend a lot of money on lightweight gear and can't afford to thru hike. Overall, my hammock, slap straps, poncho liner, underblanket, tarp, rope, and tent stakes cost me about $150.
    I'd like to hear more about a low bidget under quilt.

  7. #7
    Senior Member blackbishop351's Avatar
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    Not quite AS low-budget, but you can make Patrick's Potomac UQ for about $90.
    "Physics is the only true science. All else is stamp collecting." - J. J. Thompson

  8. #8
    Senior Member Nest's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhino-lfl View Post
    I'd like to hear more about a low bidget under quilt.
    http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php?t=633

    That is the thread where I talked about it when I made it. I will post pictures of it when I get the film developed from this weekends trip. With just the vellux and DWR I got down to the 40's. I can put a pad in the pocket, a mylar blanket, leaves, a fleece blanket, anything. That's what I like about it. It is nothing more than a pocket with wind/water resistant nylon on one side, and a very warm nylon blonket on the other. The vellux costs around $20 at KMart in the Martha Stewart section. The DWR (I think that's what it is) is Wally World $1 unk material section. So in theory I could get to as low of a temperature as I wanted. Just add whatever insulation I want into the pocket.

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