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  1. #21
    Senior Member bhinson's Avatar
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    Didn't seem to help this past September
    When the night time temps hit the low to med 40's
    Bug net or no bug net it was chilly at night
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  2. #22
    I've always felt like it did add a little warmth, mainly because as someone else pointed out it always seems like i'm being hit with cooler air when I unzip, the netting slows airflow, so you'd think your heat would leave the hammock more slowly (netting vs none) allowing the inside temp to stay a few degrees (i'd say less than 5 deg) warmer.

  3. #23
    old4hats's Avatar
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    I agree that when I unzip my net on a cold morning it sure feels as if a lot of cold air suddenly comes into the hammock. As for putting one thermometer in the hammock and one outside the hammock, the presence of your body heat in the hammock should keep that one several degrees higher than the one away from the hammock, surely not a scientific test it would seem.

  4. #24
    DuctTape's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by old4hats View Post
    I agree that when I unzip my net on a cold morning it sure feels as if a lot of cold air suddenly comes into the hammock. As for putting one thermometer in the hammock and one outside the hammock, the presence of your body heat in the hammock should keep that one several degrees higher than the one away from the hammock, surely not a scientific test it would seem.
    Exactly, but the reason it will be several degrees higher is due to the netting trapping some heat generated by ones body. Hang a digital indoor/outdoor thermometer on the ridgeline with the outdoor sensor on the opposite side of the net to measure the difference.

  5. #25
    subscribing member HanginTuff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sargevining View Post
    A net is still a solid object, regardless of how many holes it has in it.

    Try to get out of your hammock without undoing the zipper and you'll see how that works.
    exactly
    all fabric is full of holes they are just a LOT smaller than the netting. So while the R value may be negligible like .0000something it still is less than zero.
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  6. #26
    subscribing member HanginTuff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Acer View Post
    There is no R value in a mosquito net..sure they block a lite breeze in the summer and make you alittle more stuffie,,but to prove the point,,take 2 identical thermometers and hang one outside then hang one inside. Mosquito netting will hold no heat in the cold. But mosquito netting has no R value. Let the argument begin.
    I don't feel this test would actually prove it either way.

    my unqualified guess is that if you had two thermometers that were sensitive enough,that the one hanging above you in the hammock, netting or not would certainly read a higher temperature.
    Fall NEHHA 13
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  7. #27
    Acer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HanginTuff View Post
    I don't feel this test would actually prove it either way.

    my unqualified guess is that if you had two thermometers that were sensitive enough,that the one hanging above you in the hammock, netting or not would certainly read a higher temperature.
    I use 2 digital thermometers all the time..last nite,,temps inside Spindrift were 66,,outside 53...I have 2 RR's..one with bug net,,one without..use the one without the bugnet in the cold times as I don't want to lug the weight of the bug net when packing colder heavier UQ and TQ. I wouldn't want to count on getting heat out of a bugnet either or retaining warmth at 30 degrees F or colder either. Yes,,bugnet will break light breeze and alittle wind,,never had any condensation on a bug net on the inside in cool nite hangs either. I guess some of us need to hang a thermometer inside a bug net in cold weather to see if we do retain alittle heat.

  8. #28
    subscribing member HanginTuff's Avatar
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    I also have to agree with the thing many others have mentioned already, is the whole cold air hitting you in the face when you unzip it in the morning or mid-night nature call. definitely not a scientific test but it is one you can feel in the real world.

    I once saw a hundred plus page thread in the "off topic" section of a car forum discussing whether wind chill affects inanimate objects or not. Interesting discussion, but I still have no idea!
    Fall NEHHA 13
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  9. #29
    Acer's Avatar
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    Another thing about bugnets..in the summer,,the air, at nite,,is normally heavier, more moisture laden especially before the morning sun,,(dew) and in the winter,,air is colder, less dense, and less moisture,,even if its snowing. That can be 2 complete differences in a bug net retaining R Valued heat can it not?

  10. #30
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    A bugnet has no insulative value in the same sense that an underquilt would. The bugnet inhibits air (and moisture) flow, an underquilt traps air and prevents it from flowing entirely (or nearly so).

    How much difference the bugnet might make is probably moot in December in Minnesota, but down here in Texas, the difference can be enough to bring the hammock with the bugnet rather than the netless one. It can mean the difference between the interior of your hammock enclosure being above freezing or below, and will have a definete impact on any windchill that might be present.

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