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  1. #31
    Senior Member Floridahanger's Avatar
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    I guess the term most are elluding to but not exactly putting their finger on it is << MICROCLIMATE >>

    With the net on, the moisture in the air inside the net will allow the air to retain a little more heat.

    Think of a net run into the water, yes the water will go right thru, but if the holes are small enough, the water will "clog" the holes until you shake the net. This will create a small microclimate that will allow a little heat retention. Just like the closed tarp will also help.
    Enjoy and have fun with your family, before they have fun without you

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  2. #32
    Senior Member desmobob's Avatar
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    I just returned from a four-day trip in the chilly Adirondacks in NY. Temps were in the 20's the first night or two, and I definitely noticed some heat retention or at least moving air protection the bug net provided... when I unzipped it during the night for one of those I'm-over-50-now late night relief breaks, I could feel colder air rush in when I unzipped it. I'd guess it was more than a couple of degrees.

    Take it easy,
    desmobob

  3. #33

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    Acer,

    You're mostly right except for "...and in the winter,,air is colder, less dense, and less moisture,...." Colder air is actually MORE dense than warmer air. But warmer air can hold more moisture than colder air. One of the reasons we have rain is that warmer moist air rises and cools as it rises until it reaches the dew point when moisture (water vapor) condenses into water droplets (liquid water) and we have rain.



    Quote Originally Posted by Acer View Post
    Another thing about bugnets..in the summer,,the air, at nite,,is normally heavier, more moisture laden especially before the morning sun,,(dew) and in the winter,,air is colder, less dense, and less moisture,,even if its snowing. That can be 2 complete differences in a bug net retaining R Valued heat can it not?

  4. #34
    Grubartez's Avatar
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    Aug 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by desmobob View Post
    I just returned from a four-day trip in the chilly Adirondacks in NY. Temps were in the 20's the first night or two, and I definitely noticed some heat retention or at least moving air protection the bug net provided... when I unzipped it during the night for one of those I'm-over-50-now late night relief breaks, I could feel colder air rush in when I unzipped it. I'd guess it was more than a couple of degrees.

    Take it easy,
    desmobob
    I noticed the exact same thing this weekend in the mornings when I unzipped my RR. The cool air would rush in.
    Aim for the moon, if you miss, at least you will still be among the stars.

  5. #35
    sargevining's Avatar
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    Dec 2011
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    Yesterday I was testing out my new overcover on the HHDJ. It was dusk and darkening, temp was 68* outside. After an hour and a half inside, I was getting a bit warm. I unzipped the net about 4" and let some cold air in. There was a noticeable flow of air through that hole--not just a "rush" of air---a continuous flow that I suspect would have continued until the temperature inside matched that outside, as if a fan were pushing it through. I let it "run" for about a minute until I felt cool enough to be comfortable, then zipped it back up.

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