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  1. #31
    oldpappy's Avatar
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    Nov 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kremmit View Post
    That's what the underquilt does.. puts a layer of insulation between the underside of the hammock and the cold air.
    Welcome Kremmit. This is a good point and here's my view of it.
    The sleeping bag/pad vs. UQ/TQ decision has a lot to do with where and how you use your set-up.
    Cold Cold Cold - Shug's undisputed expertise shows how to extreme cold winter camp (his videos are great). In this kind of cold, you deal with condensation and heat retention - outside moisture is in frozen solid state and dry loft retains your heat. TQ/UQs of down provide loft and pack down well. Great for far North winters and desert use as well as summer backpacking.
    Cool damp as in mid Eastern US coastal areas - here you deal with down TQ/UQs getting damp and loosing effectiveness from absorbing outside moisture and inside condensation. This is accumulative over several nights and requires airing/drying out on sunny days - ok in warmer weather but dangerous in 32 degree wet snow. Synthetic TQ/UQ or sleeping bags with pads (and wool/fleece blankets) work better in cool damp environment.
    Main point is that Air flow robs your loft of heat (TQ/UQ/Sleeping bag) - I've slept warmer on 25 degree nights with no wind than on 60 degree nights with a cold wind. The issue is how to block the wind without retaining inside moisture - condensation. Hammock Socks and enclosed tarps are two common methods to do this. Pads also help here by blocking the wind from underneath. I've used a rip-stop tarp pulled in like a loose burrito wrapper on windy dry nights. Windy and rain would be sock weather. Best of both would be to use both - a wind sock and a tarp. Just Jeff has a nice pattern I used to make a soft tyvek sock to block wind and overspray, along with my tarp.
    So area/weather determine what is best for you. There is no one solution for every condition.
    This is the attractive part of hammocking that HF supports so well - no matter what you currently have and know, there is lots more to try and learn to improve your individual situation. Just have fun and get out there and enjoy it in good weather. Learn and experiment when you can't get out. This is also my excuse to get more neat stuff:>)
    Enjoying the simple things in life.
    Hennessey and DIY
    2 Seasons: Bug season and too cold for bugs

  2. #32
    markr6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Indiana
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldpappy View Post
    Welcome Kremmit. This is a good point and here's my view of it.
    The sleeping bag/pad vs. UQ/TQ decision has a lot to do with where and how you use your set-up.
    Cold Cold Cold - Shug's undisputed expertise shows how to extreme cold winter camp (his videos are great). In this kind of cold, you deal with condensation and heat retention - outside moisture is in frozen solid state and dry loft retains your heat. TQ/UQs of down provide loft and pack down well. Great for far North winters and desert use as well as summer backpacking.
    Cool damp as in mid Eastern US coastal areas - here you deal with down TQ/UQs getting damp and loosing effectiveness from absorbing outside moisture and inside condensation. This is accumulative over several nights and requires airing/drying out on sunny days - ok in warmer weather but dangerous in 32 degree wet snow. Synthetic TQ/UQ or sleeping bags with pads (and wool/fleece blankets) work better in cool damp environment.
    Main point is that Air flow robs your loft of heat (TQ/UQ/Sleeping bag) - I've slept warmer on 25 degree nights with no wind than on 60 degree nights with a cold wind. The issue is how to block the wind without retaining inside moisture - condensation. Hammock Socks and enclosed tarps are two common methods to do this. Pads also help here by blocking the wind from underneath. I've used a rip-stop tarp pulled in like a loose burrito wrapper on windy dry nights. Windy and rain would be sock weather. Best of both would be to use both - a wind sock and a tarp. Just Jeff has a nice pattern I used to make a soft tyvek sock to block wind and overspray, along with my tarp.
    So area/weather determine what is best for you. There is no one solution for every condition.
    This is the attractive part of hammocking that HF supports so well - no matter what you currently have and know, there is lots more to try and learn to improve your individual situation. Just have fun and get out there and enjoy it in good weather. Learn and experiment when you can't get out. This is also my excuse to get more neat stuff:>)
    ^^ nailed it! ^^

  3. #33
    Member
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    Nov 2013
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    New York, NY
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    if you're using a tarp, why do you need a sleeping bag?

  4. #34
    Whoooo Buddy)))) Shug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sdf View Post
    if you're using a tarp, why do you need a sleeping bag?
    Sorta like sleeping in a tent with no sleeping bag…….
    Shug
    Whoooo Buddy)))) I Love Onions, Grits, Greens, Livermush, NC Style BBQ, Potted Meat, Anchovies, 'Naner Puddin", Peanut Butter Pie, Red Velvet Cake and Cocoa and Straaaaaawwwwberrrry Milk and Coffee Crisps....
    I Hope Heaven has a Bakery!!!!



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  5. #35
    New Member hankyknot's Avatar
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    Oct 2013
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    NB, Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by sdf View Post
    if you're using a tarp, why do you need a sleeping bag?
    that's a bit like asking why you have windows and doors in your house if you have a roof lol

  6. #36
    Member Deerfight's Avatar
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    Aug 2013
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    Shug hit the nail on the head! Without your tarp, you are nothing! Without you, your tarp is nothing!
    "And here we see a wily bovine in it's natural habitat, always vigilant..." My Father

    My strength is only mine, but that is provided by the Lord above.

    ಠ_ಠ-When I see a good hang

  7. #37
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
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    RRG, Ky
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    ENO DoubleNester
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    Sleeping System

    Have you considered a sleeping system? I have a neo-trekker air sleeping system (at least i think thats what it was called) from Thermarest and as far as being warm in the hammock i don't think i could beat how toasty its been keeping me.
    Thanks,
    KSaggin.

    "Not until we are lost do we begin to understand ourselves"- Henry David Thoreau

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