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  1. #11
    Cali's Avatar
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    I prefer a 3/4 down to about 35*, then I want a full UQ to keep my feet warm. My feet get cold very easily and I find they get cold when using my 3/4 and a pad. That is just me, ymmv. Plus less fiddle when it's cold and keeping my pad under my feet when I squirm around.
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  2. #12
    Moderator Nighthauk's Avatar
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    Debate - Length of UQ

    I use a 3/4 length 20* UQ for temps down around 25* then I will throw therma rest sit pad for my feet after that. Anything below high teens and I use a -5* +/- full length UQ.
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  3. #13
    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    There probably is no unequivocal ( correct word?) for this debate. It is personal pref above all else, and maybe how much you move while sleeping etc, plus whether or not you carry a big enough ( tough not necessarily full length) pad all the time anyway plays a part. So many ways to skin a cat!

    Quote Originally Posted by Wanderlust78 View Post
    When I started hanging a couple years ago, I used a WB Yeti and a pad. Unfortunately, I suffer from both long leg syndrome and fidget-in-my-sleep syndrome. Even with triangle thingies to adjust the drop of the UQ and making adjustments to the pad, I still found myself getting frigidly cold feet mid-night during the fall months.

    For me, the comfort of a full length UQ and, more importantly, the safety of it since I prefer to camp when it gets cooler made the difference. The weight difference to me is negligible. As far as the go to ground option, I have always been a firm believer of keeping your gear tip top and trusting in your gear. I've never been forced into a situation where going to the ground was a necessity though and I hope never to be.

    I think it really comes down to what your safety tolerances are and what your trust in and knowledge of the limitations of your gear are.
    Quote Originally Posted by BajaHanger View Post
    I prefer a 3/4 down to about 35*, then I want a full UQ to keep my feet warm. My feet get cold very easily and I find they get cold when using my 3/4 and a pad. That is just me, ymmv. Plus less fiddle when it's cold and keeping my pad under my feet when I squirm around.
    OK, so here are at least two ( I suspect there are others) who seem to find it easier to keep their feet warm with a full length UQ than with a pad. So I would say in that case, which can probably only be determined by personal experience, there is no further debate needed seems to me. OTOH, we have folks here who have used a winter Yeti with leg pad down lower than minus 20F. Not to mention others who have used full length pads alone down to similar temps. So what is to be said about that? How can we say which way is better? What works for one, just as in so many other hammock related situations, does not mean it works for all.

    Quote Originally Posted by 2eez4life View Post
    3/4 length makes the most sense. It saves on quilt weight/space and that is important. I always bring a sleeping bad along so I could go to the ground if needs be. Lately I have been spontaneously joining others for backpacking trips and the trees were sparse and I was barley lucky to make something work. The pad is also the best solution IMO for reducing calf ridge and that is just as big of a comfort issue as warmth is. Greylock 3 quilt is straight killin' it.
    That can happen way more easily to you fellows out west, especially if you are hiking with buds who might want to sleep at the timberline. So far, I have only been forced to ground once, on my 3rd night in a hammock ( not counting the very 1st night when I was forced to ground because I was freezing due to user error/ignorance). And that was above 10,000 feet in the Wind Rivers, WY. Sure was glad I had my pads both nights! But I have had quite a few close calls out west, where it was hard for every member of the group to find adequate trees away from widowmakers. But so far have always managed to find trees. Not much problem in the east.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  4. #14
    Senior Member Rolloff's Avatar
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    When you're talking cold, always read and pay attention when BillyBob58 weighs in.

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  5. #15
    sjarvis's Avatar
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    Just another voice in the chorus, but I chose a 3/4 length UQ (specifically a HG 20deg. Phoenix) because:

    1. I'm short (5'8" mostly due to my stumpy legs). My 3/4 Phoenix covers everything but my head and my feet and ankles if I'm stretched out straight (which rarely happens, anyway).

    2. My topquilt (a HG 20 deg. Burrow) has as footbox that covers the bottom of my legs nearly to my knees.

    Granted, I squash the bottom of that footbox down some, but with my fluffy wool sleeping socks, my feet stay plenty warm.

    I either have a warm hat on or am using a stuffsack with some clothing for a pillow (or both) so my head is adequately protected.

    I live in the South, mostly of my camping is in Northwest and northern Arkansas up into Missouri). I rarely camp when it's colder than about 25F.

    Steven
    "We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it; we go to smooth it." -- Nessmuk

    Assistant Scoutmaster, Troop 102, Fayetteville, Arkansas

  6. #16

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    As a Texan, I fall into the same situation as sjarvis above (not camping much below 25F).

    That being said, however, I'm confused about all of the planning and gear being discussed here. My plan for unexpectedly cold weather is the same for hammocks that it has always been when using a tent: put more clothes on. I don't carry extra pads, super bulky oversized UQ or TQ, etc. Just keep on a few extra layers of warm clothing (which you are already carrying just for this reason, right?) as needed.

    Am I missing something?

  7. #17
    Senior Member 2eez4life's Avatar
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    Yeah, I would say one of the most important piece of clothing if you are camping in colder temperatures (below freezing) would be down booties. When you are wearing those in the footbox of your top quilt, there's nothing else you really need to keep them extremities warm
    Keep on Keepin' on ya'll!

  8. #18

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    I don't have any experience with full length, so mine is more of a question than an observation. Since most people sleep on an angle, it seems to me that a partial length is easier to fit to a hammock. I have never quite understood how a full length quilt can stay sealed up when your feet are pushing to the right. It seems like your foot pressure would open a gap and make it tough to seal the foot end. Does that make sense? I even find it tough sometimes with my 58 inch Jarbidge. I think my next underquilt will be a shorter one, either a 52 inch Greylock or Phoenix. It seems like ending at the knees will allow the suspension to hang better, and your feet can just stick out to the right without affecting the underquilt fit. Thoughts? Maybe I am imagining a problem that doesn't exist.

  9. #19
    Whoooo Buddy)))) Shug's Avatar
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    I use a partial length 97.5% of the time. Takes up less space in my pack.
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  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by weaver2469 View Post
    I don't have any experience with full length, so mine is more of a question than an observation. Since most people sleep on an angle, it seems to me that a partial length is easier to fit to a hammock. I have never quite understood how a full length quilt can stay sealed up when your feet are pushing to the right. It seems like your foot pressure would open a gap and make it tough to seal the foot end. Does that make sense? I even find it tough sometimes with my 58 inch Jarbidge. I think my next underquilt will be a shorter one, either a 52 inch Greylock or Phoenix. It seems like ending at the knees will allow the suspension to hang better, and your feet can just stick out to the right without affecting the underquilt fit. Thoughts? Maybe I am imagining a problem that doesn't exist.
    Wondering the same thing.

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