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  1. #11
    RadicalHope's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nothermark View Post
    My bad. I meant fleece over the top of a CCF pad, space blanket or any other impervious layer. Really anything above the layer will get wet from it but some things handle the moisture better than others.

    You might want to read up on vapor barrier clothing or sleep systems. You will get a better understanding of how the body produces moisture and how to deal with it.
    Ah, got it.

    Okay, will do. Thank you!
    With a radical sense of hope, I strive for the seemingly impossible.

  2. #12
    fallkniven's Avatar
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    Condensation build up is inevitable in the cold. Even if your have no tarp or over cover of any kind, it'll build up around your mouth or whatever clothing you've got covering it. I've never bothered trying an over cover or sock, because of all my years spent in a tent, I knew it would be more trouble than it's worth. Even with jst my tarp over me pitched open, it'll still build up on t inside of the tarp.
    The only insulation that I can say works no matter how wet it gets, is wiggy's lamilite bags, and wool of course. Only problem with them is they're bulky and heavy.
    I got all new quilts from UGQ with the new dwr down. That excels where condensation becomes a problem. Getting your bag/quilt wet is no big deal for a weekend trip. When your out for a while, that repetitive wetting will build up and and it gets harder to dry out. That's where it's a real problem. And that's where the dwr down shines.

    What I've found that really helps, and mostly works so well because of the bridge hammock design, which I think yours is. The frost bib isn't for me, I move around too much. And no matter what, moisture us building up, if not on me, then on the tarp, then on me.
    I have a thin wool blanket I got cheap from a surplus store. I cut a piece off to place over top of my quilt. That way it stays dry, the wool lets it continue to breathe, yet stops any moisture building up on top of it. Now if you had a vapor barrier liner/clothes to stop moisture rising through the quilt, and your wool blanket on top protecting it from all the breathing, then you shouldn't have any reason to worry.
    When it gets real cold, I find just a tq does it for me. I move around and the quilt comes loose. So I'll take a small summer bag and/or a vp liner to use inside my quilt. It gives me the full seal of a bag, yet I still have the bulk of my insulation a light and compressible down quilt.
    Also, look into hot tenting, I actually have a tarp made for a ahammock that is shaped like a tent with a collapsible titanium wood stove. The tarp and stove together weigh under 5lb, and take up little room. It's hard to tell you how nice it is to wake up in a warm place to get dressed, then have a warm place to undress and fall asleep. It even pre warms my quilts if I let it burn good for a little bit.

  3. #13
    RadicalHope's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fallkniven View Post
    Condensation build up is inevitable in the cold. Even if your have no tarp or over cover of any kind, it'll build up around your mouth or whatever clothing you've got covering it. I've never bothered trying an over cover or sock, because of all my years spent in a tent, I knew it would be more trouble than it's worth. Even with jst my tarp over me pitched open, it'll still build up on t inside of the tarp.
    To me, an over cover is totally worth the trouble. It helps me retain heat. I love having my little protected shelter full of warmth, even if there is some condensation build up. To each their own.

    Quote Originally Posted by fallkniven View Post
    The only insulation that I can say works no matter how wet it gets, is wiggy's lamilite bags, and wool of course. Only problem with them is they're bulky and heavy.
    I have a doobie (like a poncho liner on steroids) from Kifaru made out of combat climashield that I believe is very similar, if not the same as Wiggy's lamilite. That thing rocks, even when wet, and it doesn't stay wet long. My sleeping bag is made of climashield prism and apex, and seems to have the same qualities. No matter how wet it got on the top layer, the insulation itself appeared to stay dry, or dried so quickly that it did not affect warmth. After I got up in the morning, every thing was bone dry within an hour, even the outer layer, despite the fact that I left it inside the zipped up hammock instead of airing it out right away. My set up is probably close to the weight of Wiggy's though, unfortunately. I'm at about 4.5 lbs. Fine for base camp, not so great for backpacking, but doable.


    Quote Originally Posted by fallkniven View Post
    I got all new quilts from UGQ with the new dwr down. That excels where condensation becomes a problem. Getting your bag/quilt wet is no big deal for a weekend trip. When your out for a while, that repetitive wetting will build up and and it gets harder to dry out. That's where it's a real problem. And that's where the dwr down shines.
    I'm a Hammock Gear fan personally (totally in love with my 0+* Incubator) and now that he is using treated down, I have certainly been eyeing picking up a TQ. I'll likely keep using the Kifaru Doobie as well, just because I know that thing will never let me down and could be a real life saver. But it would be nice to replace the weight and bulk of my sleeping bag with the TQ.

    Quote Originally Posted by fallkniven View Post
    What I've found that really helps, and mostly works so well because of the bridge hammock design, which I think yours is.
    The Clark is actually not a bridge hammock, and is technically a gathered end hammock. That said, I agree it seems to be a completely different animal from other gathered end hammocks. Not really sure why that is, but I love it.

    Quote Originally Posted by fallkniven View Post
    The frost bib isn't for me, I move around too much. And no matter what, moisture us building up, if not on me, then on the tarp, then on me.
    This is a really excellent point. I tend to move fairly frequently as well. I don't think the frost bib would work well for me either. I think I will have to manage my condensation in other ways.

    Quote Originally Posted by fallkniven View Post
    I have a thin wool blanket I got cheap from a surplus store. I cut a piece off to place over top of my quilt. That way it stays dry, the wool lets it continue to breathe, yet stops any moisture building up on top of it. Now if you had a vapor barrier liner/clothes to stop moisture rising through the quilt, and your wool blanket on top protecting it from all the breathing, then you shouldn't have any reason to worry.
    The wool blanket piece makes a ton of sense and I guess is basically what the outer layer of my sleeping bag was doing for me. Perhaps if I swap my sleeping bag for a TQ, I can still use the Doobie over top of everything to handle any condensation.


    Quote Originally Posted by fallkniven View Post
    When it gets real cold, I find just a tq does it for me. I move around and the quilt comes loose. So I'll take a small summer bag and/or a vp liner to use inside my quilt. It gives me the full seal of a bag, yet I still have the bulk of my insulation a light and compressible down quilt.
    I am liking this idea a lot. The full seal of a bag is nice in the colder weather to prevent drafts. I certainly had draft problems experimenting with using everything as a TQ. I normally zip up inside the sleeping bag and don't have any problems. The summer bag seems ideal combined with a down TQ. Hmmm, will have to tweak my system a bit, I think. I was thinking down TQ combined with my Doobie, but hmmm... would still need something to get that full seal perhaps...

    Do you get inside your summer bag and then layer your down TQ over you, or do you use the TQ inside the sleeping bag like a liner almost?

    Quote Originally Posted by fallkniven View Post
    Also, look into hot tenting, I actually have a tarp made for a ahammock that is shaped like a tent with a collapsible titanium wood stove. The tarp and stove together weigh under 5lb, and take up little room. It's hard to tell you how nice it is to wake up in a warm place to get dressed, then have a warm place to undress and fall asleep. It even pre warms my quilts if I let it burn good for a little bit.
    I am definitely going to look into this. Backyard testing is one thing... sleeping all nice and warm and then heading inside to make breakfast. Now I have to figure out how to stay warm outside while I cook, eat, etc etc.

    Thanks for all the feedback and tips. Great stuff here. I appreciate it!
    With a radical sense of hope, I strive for the seemingly impossible.

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