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  1. #1
    Boston's Avatar
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    DIY Decorative Wall Mount

    The other day I had made some simple, decorative wall mounts for my hammock. I think all in you're out less than $50. I can't quite remember.

    NMardin asked me for instructions, so I figured I'd post it here for anyone to see. Sorry no pictures of the process - this is an after thought. If anything isn't clear please ask! Pictures of the finished product and a quick diagram are attached below.

    It's not very hard to make. All the materials came from Lowes, except the d-rings which I found at Tractor Supply.

    I will make one caution: I don't make any claim of a weight rating for the mount. I weight 150lbs, and don't see any sign of stress on the wall, or the mount after hanging, swinging (gently), and sleeping the the hammock. I've spend a few nights and a few day's total hanging out in it so far.

    Materials:
    (2) 1" x 5.5" x 24" oak boards (Lowes sells these individually)
    (2) ~6.5" x 4.5" oak rosettes (You can find these near's the hand railings at Lowes)
    (4) 1/4" x 1.5" construction Lag screws (more decorative looking than a normal hex head lags) - These are to mount the d-ring to the wall mount. They also help assemble the rosette to the oak board.
    (4) 5/32" x 3" construction lag screws (needs T30 Torx driver) - these are to mount the wall mount to the wall
    (4) 1/4" x 1.5" wood screws - these are to assemble the rosette to the oak board.
    (1) small bottle of gorilla glue (just a little extra insurance on the rosette to oak board assembly)
    (2) light duty surface mount d-rings

    Tools:
    1) Drill (bench drill is best for assembling the mount, but a hand drill works. And of course you need a hand drill for your wall)
    2) Miter saw
    2) Screw driver (phillips or flat depending of the wood screws you have)
    3) T30 and T25 torx drivers for the lag screws. Don't use a power drill to drive the lag screws, you'll risk stripping out the hole.
    4) Pencil
    5) Optional - spray paint and primer.
    6) Optional - wood stain and sealer.
    7) Optional - fine grit sand paper.

    Process:

    Prep:
    1) I painted the d-ring mount black, so it wouldn't look like unfinished metal. Black because that's what I had at the house.
    2) Sand and stain the wood, if you want. I left it natural.

    Oak Boards:
    3) On the oak boards make a mark 2" in from each corner (8 total per board) and connect them across the corner's. Use this line to make the corner cut's with your miter saw.
    4) On the back side of the oak board measure and mark the horizontal and vertical center lines.
    5) On the horizontal center line measure 2.5" from the vertical center line and a mark. Do this in both directions.
    6) Drill 1/4" clearance holes for the 1/4" wood screws at your marks
    7) Using a drill bit that is at least as large as the head of your wood screws, make a shallow counter bore on these holes on the back side of the board. (This will ensure the wood screws seat sub-flush to the back of the board)
    8) On the horizontal center line make two marks 16" apart, centered around the vertical center line. (This may vary depending on the stud spacing in your walls. Confirm your wall before drilling. 16" is usually standard)
    9) Drill 5/32" clearance holes for the 3" lag screws at your marks (this may vary depending on the lag screws you choose)

    Rosettes:
    10) On the back side of the rosette measure and mark the horizontal and vertical center lines. This can be difficult due to the oval shape. Double check your markings, or it will mount crooked.
    11) On the horizontal center line measure 2.5" from the vertical center line and make a mark. Do this in both directions.
    12) Drill 7/64" pilot holes 1/2" deep for the 1/4" wood screws at your marks. [CRITCAL] Do NOT drill through to the front side of the rosette.

    Assembly: (yes, we did not drill the holes for the 1.5" lag screws yet)
    13) Use a damp cloth or paper towel and dampen the back surface of the rosette and the front surface of the oak board where it will mount.
    14) Apply thin lines of gorilla glue to the back side of the rosette as shown
    15) Line up the holes for the wood screws and press the two pieces together. Insert the screws and tighten.
    16) On the vertical center line on the back of the oak board make 2 marks spaced 1.5" apart and centered on the horizontal center line.
    17) Drill 7/64" pilot holes for the 1.5" lag screws at your marks (drill size may vary based on the lag screws you choose). Drill all the way through to the front of the rosette.
    18) Assemble the D-Ring and use the 1.5" lag screws to attach it to the front of the rosette.

    You're done! All that's left is to mount it to your wall. Find the center of the 2 studs and drill pilot holes for the 3" lag screws, then use the 3" lags to mount you're hanger to the wall.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    boulderv7's Avatar
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    That looks really nice. I may have to run this one by the Boss for some more hanging options in the house. Really creative.
    My head is an animal

  3. #3
    Member
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    Very nice job, really clean looking.will be interested to see if it starts to pull away.

  4. #4
    Dos's Avatar
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    Looks really nice.

    I prefer simpler, but that is very well done.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~
    In some mysterious way woods have never
    seemed to me to be static things.
    In physical terms, I move through them;
    yet in metaphysical ones,
    they seem to move through me. -
    John Fowles


    GA --> ME '12

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