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Thread: Ridgelines?

  1. #1
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    Question Ridgelines?

    So I have never used a ridge line. Do I need one? What are the pros and cons?

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    I am assuming you are talking about a structural ridgeline on your hammock and not a ridgeline for your tarp.

    Do you need a ridgeline on your hammock? Short answer = no You can certainly hang without one.

    Do you want one? Perhaps. Do you want to do a hang it once and have it always lay the same regardless of distance between trees (within reason)? Then you want a ridgeline.

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    Whoooo Buddy)))) Shug's Avatar
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    I like a ridge line. Can hang stuff from it (mesh bag, knife, clothes, flashlight, etc.). Can hold on and lean on it when changing pants. Sets my hammock sag.
    They are an option and many do not use them. Easy to hook one up and see if it works for you.
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    Senior Member nacra533's Avatar
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    Yes for me.
    I have a sack that hangs from it. I put my glasses, headlamp, and water bottle in it. Even without the sack, I hung it all on the ridgeline.

    It also serves as a handle to get my out of shape self in and out of the hammock. A place to hang clothing between warmer days and cooler nights, under the tarp.

    Even if it's not structural (keeps hammock lay consistent), I recommend it.
    KCCO

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    Prefers life at 12 MPH. FLRider's Avatar
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    For me, it's worth the extra ounce or three. It's just too useful when setting up the hammock (my drive towards "more foolproof" is due to often being exhausted when I get to camp; if I can screw something up, it's probably going to be then), offers a place to hang stuff, and keeps the bug netting off of my face.

    YMMV, of course.
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    --Floridahanger

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    BlazeAway's Avatar
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    You do not need one, but it comes in handy since you get the same sag on the hammock each time you set it up. And you can hang stuff from it, and if on an uneasy footing you can grab the ridge and get back in balance. The cons are added weight (which is minimal).

    Best,
    Blaze

  7. #7
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    I like a ridgeline for the reasons already listed. Plus, on uneven terrain, it helps me to determine level, so I can adjust the foot end up a bit.

  8. #8
    designer@quickdata.com's Avatar
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    No one is posting a "down side" except for weight (minimal) so here are some thoughts. If you are tall or tall waisted and you spend some time in camp using your hammock as a chair, the ridge line can keep messing with the back of your head. If you have a ridge line, it will influence you NOT to experiment with different hang angles - especially if the ridge line is fixed. If you have and adjustable ridge line be sure to install it so the adjustment part is at the foot end. Because the adjustment will have a tail. And the tail will dangle down in your face (how do I know that?).

    Is this for a tarp or hammock? If a hammock, is it "built-in" or are you adding it? If you are adding it, will you a make it a fixed length (83% of physical hammock length) or adjustable? And you thought it was a simple question

  9. #9
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    83% of hammock length, this is for the hammock body, yes? or does it include suspension to fixed points? Reason I ask; for my hammock, the body is 103"(YES it's Short...), while with the suspension to the Quick Links; it's 151" without the mini spreader bars installed... I am thinking if I want fixed ridgeline, it would be tied to the Quick Links, since I have no place on the body to attach it....so am wondering what the measurement should be? 83% of the body (103") + whatever it takes to get to the quick links, or 83% of the distance between Quick Links?

  10. #10
    designer@quickdata.com's Avatar
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    I could be wrong but I think the 83% came from the desired hang angle of 30 degrees. So if I had an 11 ft hammock hanging at 30 degrees it would put then end to end distance (just the hammock, none of the suspension) at 9 ft - ish or 108 inches. But remember, that is a starting point; a fuzzy target. And literature says a bridge hammock is often just a bit tighter, like 25 degrees.

    If your physical hammock is 103 inches then the 83% would make the end to end distance 85 inches, about 7 ft - isn. But if your ridge line extended beyond the end to end points, you'd have to add more length.

    T'were it me. I'd hang the hammock at 30 degrees, see if it is comfortable (remember these numbers are just suggested starting points) and if so, measure the distance between your ridge line attachment points and make the line.

    For me, the biggest challenge is I'm doing this mostly solo and the hammock really needs a body in it to adjust things like UQ cinch up and all these other measurements.

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