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  1. #1
    New Member
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    How LOW can you go?

    Nope! Not referencing any Grease style Hand Jive dancing!

    I wanted to get some feedback on how low of a temperature is comfortable without an underquilt......

    and.......

    Would hanging lower to the ground and using the rainfly/tarp almost like a tent make a difference?

    I only plan to 3 season hang for now, but I do live in Michigan and if I travel up north near Canada, even in June, July, and August the lows will typically be in the low 50's to high 40's.

    My gear would consist of the following:

    * Hennessy Explorer Zip
    * Hennessy large hex fly
    * 20 degree synthetic sleeping bag
    * Terramar Txo base layer pants and long sleeve shirt
    * Merino wool socks
    * 100% nylon convertible pants
    * Snythetic shirt
    * Fleece hoodie
    * Mylar emergency blanket (I would prefer not to use)

    and I was thinking of buying one of those underquilt protectors from 2QZQ to add to the bottom of the hammock.

    I had almost the exact same setup last year except for I only had the small stock Hennessy fly and I did not have the underquilt protector. I was in the Boundary Waters Wilderness area and the temp dropped into the low 40's to high 30's a couple of nights. I survived, but was pretty much misserable. The wind just sucked all of the heat out of me at night.

    So any advice, tips, or thoughts are appreciated. I have exhausted my budget on gear this winter for 2014, so getting an actual underquilt will have to wait until 2015.

  2. #2
    craige's Avatar
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    I think anything under 60F most people need something under them. If you got any sleep in those nights in the low 40s/30s then you must be a very warm sleeper.

    Pitching your tarp lower won't do much except cut wind, unless it has doors to create a micro climate.

    You could always get a cheap blue ccf pad for a couple bucks instead of the uqp, and that should serve you much better until you can get a quilt.

  3. #3
    bloomgorge's Avatar
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    I Think Your Trip Should Wait Until Then As Well. You Need An Uq To Effectively Stay Warm. Try A Pad If You Have One, Trade Gear Or Borrow.
    http://smartoutdoors.webs.com/ elephant trunks, tarp keys and crosses

  4. #4

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    If you are really going to camp 3 season in MN I would spend the money and buy the Super Shelter from HH and add a solar blanket and you will be set. If it really got colf you can put your jacket in the SS as well. Just to let you know that I have the SS and added the solar blanket and when it is in the 30* I still sleep in a pair of shorts and tee shirt. Well worth the money.

  5. #5
    DuctTape's Avatar
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    The question is not how low can one go without an UQ, but without any insulation under them. The answer is not far. I go to the negative 20s without an UQ, but I am using ccf pads.

    Not sure of your plans with the emergency blanket. If you use it with a trash bag, and rig a poncho as a garlington insulator you can get quite low. Probably single digits.

  6. #6
    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    My comments in red

    Quote Originally Posted by MichHiker1 View Post
    Nope! Not referencing any Grease style Hand Jive dancing!

    I wanted to get some feedback on how low of a temperature is comfortable without an underquilt......

    and.......

    Would hanging lower to the ground and using the rainfly/tarp almost like a tent make a difference?

    BB says:Not much unless you have some dry leaves or some form of insulation touching your back. But as long as there is a layer of cold air plus any air movement at all under your back, it is going to be cold. Although, I can see where it would still be better then being a couple of feet above the ground with a solid breeze blowing under you. But not enough most likely.

    I only plan to 3 season hang for now, but I do live in Michigan and if I travel up north near Canada, even in June, July, and August the lows will typically be in the low 50's to high 40's.

    My gear would consist of the following:

    * Hennessy Explorer Zip
    * Hennessy large hex fly
    * 20 degree synthetic sleeping bag
    * Terramar Txo base layer pants and long sleeve shirt
    * Merino wool socks
    * 100% nylon convertible pants
    * Snythetic shirt
    * Fleece hoodie
    * Mylar emergency blanket (I would prefer not to use)

    and I was thinking of buying one of those underquilt protectors from 2QZQ to add to the bottom of the hammock.

    I had almost the exact same setup last year except for I only had the small stock Hennessy fly and I did not have the underquilt protector. I was in the Boundary Waters Wilderness area and the temp dropped into the low 40's to high 30's a couple of nights. I survived, but was pretty much misserable. The wind just sucked all of the heat out of me at night.

    BB says:My gosh that sounds truly as miserable as you say. Been there done that.


    So any advice, tips, or thoughts are appreciated. I have exhausted my budget on gear this winter for 2014, so getting an actual underquilt will have to wait until 2015.
    Quote Originally Posted by craige View Post
    I think anything under 60F most people need something under them. BB says:And for plenty of people anything below 70 or 75. I need a little something even sleeping in my house!

    If you got any sleep in those nights in the low 40s/30s then you must be a very warm sleeper.

    Pitching your tarp lower won't do much except cut wind, unless it has doors to create a micro climate.

    You could always get a cheap blue ccf pad for a couple bucks instead of the uqp, and that should serve you much better until you can get a quilt.
    BB: That right there. Some folks hate pads, some like them. But there is no doubt you can be warm for cheap, you just have to work out how to stay on top of the pad all night. But it's better than freezing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoefor2 View Post
    If you are really going to camp 3 season in MN I would spend the money and buy the Super Shelter from HH and add a solar blanket and you will be set. If it really got colf you can put your jacket in the SS as well. Just to let you know that I have the SS and added the solar blanket and when it is in the 30* I still sleep in a pair of shorts and tee shirt. Well worth the money.
    Nice praise for the lowly HHSS there, Canoefor2! Welcome to the fairly small, but happy, HHSS club!

    But MichHiker1, 1st thing use that cheap CCF pad, but: is your "20 degree synthetic sleeping bag" a fairly roomy model? And does it have a full length zipper, and can you get your hammocks net fully out of the way? If so, I highly suggest- until you you can get an UQ or HHSS- looking into- experimenting with- using your bag Pea Pod style. Look up Shug's many videos on the subject. Just unzip the bag all the way and wrap it around the entire hammock but NOT the ridge line. Zip it up enough to keep it in place, get in and zip up all of the way. You may have to add some clothing to fill some gaps above or below you. You may end up having to sew some loops onto the bag and use some shock cord to snug the bag up in certain spots. Try to adjust it so that either the bag, or the bag plus whatever clothing you might add below, is just barely touching your back. Add more unworn clothing on top as needed to fill gaps. Cost= zero $. If that bag is actually warm at 20F, then prepare to be warm!
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  7. #7
    SilvrSurfr's Avatar
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    With that setup, I would think 40 degrees would be uncomfortable because you have no bottom insulation.

    When I first started hammock camping, I had a Hennessy hammock, ccf pad, and 0* synthetic bag that took me comfortably down to 22 degrees. While the pad provided proper under-insulation, it also caused condensation. That's when I decided to go with down TQ/UQ and give up the pad.

    Hanging hammock and tarp lower to the ground does not add heat but might block wind that will rob you of heat. Same thing with an underquilt protector - it's not insulation. It's to block some wind and protect your underquilt, but you don't have one.

    The sleeping bag won't provide any under insulation either. Once you lay on it and compress the insulation, it loses loft and almost all insulative properties.

    You add a pad to that setup and I'd say it would be good to 30 degrees. I don't know what kind of synthetic bag you have, but I generally find synthetics to run colder than their stated rating, whereas down tends to run warmer than its stated rating.
    Last edited by SilvrSurfr; 02-13-2014 at 00:10.
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  8. #8
    Refreshing's Avatar
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    Just go to wally world and buy one of those cheapo foam pads, you can always upgrade later. The first night I ever stayed in a hammock was 55* and no bottom insulation so I understand when you say you were "miserable" on your trip. Remember the pain and suffering? Use that as motivation to spend a few bucks on something that will actually allow you to sleep at night.
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  9. #9
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    Some good advice. Thanks.

    So if during my hikes the low temperature will usually be 55 to 60 degrees what underquilt would you recommend?

    Please keep in mind I exclusively hike. So my current pack for 3-4 nights is about 28lbs-30lbs with fishing gear, food, and all. I would prefer to add as little weight as possible.

    Also, as I am using the Hennessy, so it is asymetrical and I sleep at an angle. I don't know if this affects the type of underquilt needed. I do know that it makes using either one of my Thermarest pads very difficult to get positioned well. (I have not tried putting the pad in the bottom of my sleeping bag yet though).

    So maybe if I can find a small, lightweight underquilt that will do the job I will go ahead and spend the cash this year to get it.

  10. #10
    Ratdog's Avatar
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    Goodwill, used sleeping bag for less than $20.
    A little DIY action.
    BOOM
    Underquilt
    Have sherpas, will travel...

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