Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    New Member SuperJunge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Cardiff California
    Hammock
    Eno double nest
    Tarp
    Warbonnet superfly
    Insulation
    Eno ember, selkbag
    Suspension
    Atlas straps
    Posts
    4

    Synthetic to down underquilt conversion

    I have an eno ember, yes and eno underquilt say what you will, but I have loved it so much. My only modification was putting 2 parka zippers on the edges to make it a pod which has worked wonderfully, I have taken it down to the 40's with nothing else comfortably. My new challenge is that I will soon be going to college in the cold state of michigan, and I will still want to hammock camp. I want to convert my current underquilt from synthetic to down insulation, but I am rather nervous about the process. I'm confident with my sewing abilities, but down is an entirely new element for me. My main interest in doing this is to get the same packability that I have now, with a hammock pod that will go comfortably into the 20's. It's not really a matter of money, just want to reuse what I already have, and if it saves me a few $ then I'm all for it. Anyone have any experience with this? Or perhaps someone who would be willing to do the job?

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Victoria, BC
    Hammock
    Exped Ergo
    Tarp
    Exped Combi
    Insulation
    Sleeping bag+pad
    Suspension
    Eyelet line+ biner
    Posts
    1,087
    Your plan is to remove the synthetic insulation and then re-use the shell with down fill?

  3. #3

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    MA
    Hammock
    Eno DN, replaced cords and biners.
    Tarp
    Noah's Tarp 12'
    Insulation
    Warm Stuff
    Suspension
    SLS with UCRs
    Posts
    123
    Are you sure the fabric is down proof? And are there baffles or is it sewn-through construction. I fear that even if those two issues are resolved, that you'll have moisture issues - the inner layer is plain ripstop, but the outer is silnylon. You're going to drive moisture into the quilt and when it hits the outside layer it will condense there and will not be able to escape to the outside. Your down will get more damp each night until you get a day warm enough to dry the quilt out through its thickness.

  4. #4
    New Member SuperJunge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Cardiff California
    Hammock
    Eno double nest
    Tarp
    Warbonnet superfly
    Insulation
    Eno ember, selkbag
    Suspension
    Atlas straps
    Posts
    4
    Victoriaguy, yes that's my theory, I have heard of it being done with sleeping bags before, so i would guess that underquilts are a similar task.

    Genixia, I have the old version of the ember, not the current version, so both walls are ripstop and are tight enough to be down proof. It is sewn through, but I have the sewing skills if necessary to put in no see em baffling if necessary.

  5. #5
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    South Central IN
    Hammock
    WBRR, Lots of DIY
    Tarp
    MacCat; Cloudburst
    Insulation
    Lynx, Ridge Creek
    Suspension
    Varies
    Posts
    5,153
    I don't see this working out at all. You will have to rip all the seams out and basically start from scratch.

    The even greater deal killer problem I see is that for 20* temps, you will need at least 2.5" baffles with the filled channels/pockets in between lofting on up around 4". Assuming there is any differential cut on the existing shells (outer shell cut larger than the inner shell), it will be minimal for the existing thin synthetic insulation. The result will be that the "new" down insulation (regardless of baffle height) will be smashed close to the thickness of the existing insulation and provide little if any additional warmth. Short version...a lot of work for nothing.

    Do yourself a huge favor, buy new materials to make a new UQ and only use the ember as a general model if that is the style you want.

  6. #6
    Senior Member squidbilly's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Alabamistan
    Hammock
    DIY
    Tarp
    DIY
    Insulation
    DIY
    Suspension
    DIY
    Posts
    518
    Images
    20
    #1 what gmcttr said, especially if you are confident in your sewing skills.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Tendertoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Hammock
    WBRR
    Tarp
    Superfly
    Insulation
    HG
    Suspension
    webbing and rings
    Posts
    1,352
    Like others have mentioned you're going to end up pretty much starting from scratch anyways.

    The bulk of the cost in making a quilt is the down so my thought would be save what you have. Start truly from scratch with raw materials and you'll end up with 2 quilts. You can share with a friend, you can make a winter quilt from scratch and thereby have 2 quilts for different weather conditions, etc.

  8. #8
    Senior Member e_2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Hammock
    DIY RS custom
    Tarp
    DIY winter custom
    Insulation
    DIY UQ+TQ &/or bag
    Suspension
    DIY Whoopie+Straps
    Posts
    139
    Quote Originally Posted by Tendertoe View Post
    Like others have mentioned you're going to end up pretty much starting from scratch anyways.

    The bulk of the cost in making a quilt is the down so my thought would be save what you have. Start truly from scratch with raw materials and you'll end up with 2 quilts. You can share with a friend, you can make a winter quilt from scratch and thereby have 2 quilts for different weather conditions, etc.
    Ditto and +1 on the "share with a friend". If you like what you have, don't destroy it... just use it for the right season. Michigan isn't cold all the time.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    MA
    Hammock
    Eno DN, replaced cords and biners.
    Tarp
    Noah's Tarp 12'
    Insulation
    Warm Stuff
    Suspension
    SLS with UCRs
    Posts
    123
    What they all said! You can save about $30 and waste hours of your time ripping seams to end up with one less optimal quilt, or save hours of your time, spend another $30 and end up with 2 quilts, each optimised to a purpose. It seems to me that with sewing skills, the sewing can be fast, but ripping seams is always time-consuming.

    Decisions, decisions...

  10. #10
    Senior Member Rolloff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Leveland
    Hammock
    BIAS WW
    Tarp
    AHE Toxaway
    Insulation
    JRB SS HG Clone
    Suspension
    Whoopies Straps
    Posts
    1,200
    Much better off with a shell from Underquilts.com. Even if the material is down proof, once you finish ripping all the stitching, it certainly won't be. Synthetic quilt and bag construction differ quite a bit, from that required by down fills.
    This place you say your lookin' for
    It might have washed out with the rain
    Might not be there anymore
    Might not be the same

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •