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  1. #11
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    A reply I got back from metolius was as follows:
    "The aluminum is 3000 series and the thickness is approx 1/8".

  2. #12
    try them and see, they're only 2 bucks,

    i'm thinking the only way they'd be worth anything is if you could use them like a cinch buckle, but i don't think that hook will hold.

    let us know if you end up trying them

  3. #13
    New Member
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    Jun 2009
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    I want to give 'em a shot, but I can't seem to find anywhere to get them without paying 10 bucks in shipping ^_^
    What I really would like is exactly like the belt I have...It's a cinch plus a v-ring, which would be fantastic. It would let you loop cord or clip a biner without worrying about misalignment...but alas, I've found none (onerope1 only has 1.75"). And since it's a 'fashion' belt, it's 16 bucks...
    http://www.bisondesigns.com/mm5/merc...ory_Code=Belts

  4. #14
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    Sep 2008
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    Asheville, NC
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    Wow cool! I was wondering if anyone else had thought about these. Several months ago I was in the climbing store getting ready to plunk down some money for a set of rapelling rings to make a ring buckle system and I looked down in their display case and saw 4 of those Metolius hooks. At $2.50 each and needing just 2 vs. something like $10 each and needing 4 I thought I'd try them. Here's what I've got.

    My hammock is just a rectangular piece of 1.9 ripstop with channels sewn into the ends. Through the channels I've sewn a loop of 1 inch webbing about 10 inchs long to make a webbing loop at each end. Then I took two 10foot pieced of the same 1 inch webbing and sewed a small loop into each end. I wrap the 10' webbing around the tree slip the tag end throught the loop at the end and pull tight. I have the Metolius on that loose end of the webbing. Then I just put the loop in the hammock onto the hook and pull to adjust the length.

    I've spent about 12 nights in it and it holds just fine. I've even done a heavy duty, non scientific bouncing test and it seems fine. I weigh 170.

    It's not perfect though. The webbing I have slips in it, particularly if it's wet. So I have to adjust to were I want it and then I throw a loose overhand knot on a bite with a stick in the bite and it's fine. I've tried very lightly sanding the metal to see if it holds better and it hasn't significantly helped. I may try to sand it rougher. And yes, the webbing twists in there sometimes. Still holds.

    Since I have to put the knot in there it made me wonder if it was any better than just tying a knot with out the hook. That's how my wifes's set up is currently. One thing that makes me think the hook is worth it is rain water soaking down the strap from the tree doesn't get past the hook like it does on the simple knot system.

    I have pictures and weights I can post tommorrow if you're interested.

  5. #15
    Knotty's Avatar
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    Mar 2009
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    Interested.
    Knotty
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  6. #16
    Senior Member Fig's Avatar
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    Apr 2009
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    Briggs, TX
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    Instead of sanding the metal, how about adding something like griptape for skateboards? I don't know how abrasive it would be on the straps, but I bet it would keep it from slipping.

    Going the other direction, how about that no slip little plastic pieces that you can buy at the dollar store as 'shelf liner'. You wouldn't need to glue it or stick it down, just wrap it in there so that it's caught between the metal and the strap. I use it on my kayak seat to keep it from moving around when I am in it. Works wonders.

    Edit: So I just looked at my avatar picture, and realized that I also use a blue piece for my dog to stand/sit on when he is on the kayak. It gives him some grip so he can run from side to side sticking his nose into the wind.

  7. #17
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    Sep 2008
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    Asheville, NC
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    Well, my computer took a dump on me it seems and I've lost maybe everything on it, including hammock pictures. But anyways....

    I weighed the two straps with the two buckles and it comes to 5.40 ounces for the pair. I have an accurate balance.

    You can't see the hook system in this picture, but here's a picture I still had on my camera from our latest outing. You can at least see the type of strap I'm using. BTW, this was a double hang set up under a Speer Winter Tarp. That thing's great for two or for one in nasty weather.


    Fig, your ideas for keeping the strap from slipping have me thinking. The stick works fine and it's not something I have to carry, but sometimes it's a bit hard to get the stick out.

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