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  1. #11
    Senior Member Gordzilla's Avatar
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    (Insert typical "I'm no expert but..." disclaimer here)
    I sometimes hang my bb so that when I'm laying in it, the ridge line is loose and actually sagging a fair bit. It is quite comfy and I usually pull my self closer to the head end when I do this, and lay on a more pronounced diagonal. I also raise the foot end a little in this configuration.
    Other times I hang it so that the ridge line is just tight. It has some mild tension on it but it is not really tight. When hanging this way I move closer down to the foot end. I also usually hang it this way when I have the yeti on because the shock cord tends to negate any benifit I get from hanging it loosely. I usually hang it straight across this way and I don't seem to move. I never have it taught as I don't like it that way at all. But that's me. I basically let the terrain dictate how I will stake it out, but I prefer higher on the shelf side and middle of the road on the zipper side.

    I hang it as low as possible but again terrain dictates. often the underbrush is thick and deep so it can get a little lofty. but some times it's just missing the ground by about 5-6 inches . Iv'e not yet ever streched and touched the ground. It stays put pretty well.
    The original BB stuff sack kinda fell apart so I made a bishop style bag out of one I had laying around. I used to use my snake skins but it all seems to pack nicer in a regular stuff sack.

    I think there are no real rights or wrongs in hammocking. Heck I don't even have a "perfect" for me. It changes depending on mood, area, or weather I'm in. Everyone has a slightly different way of doing thing, some are way different. For example, Shug has said he lays with his feet completely opposite to the foot box. (actually kinda comfy by the way), and the other day I lay with my head in the foot box, also kinda comfy. I have even slept directly down the center on the "ridge" and let one leg hang over into the foot box fold. You just gotta play around with it try everything. Try what others recommend then try it opposite of that, see what ya like. you'll find your sweet spot(s) sooner or later. If not try again.
    That is my favourite thing about this forum next to the great people, is so many different opinions and ideas that I get to go "OH YEAH, why didn't I think of that!" then go running outside to try it.
    Embarassing is being the last item in a discount bin.

    No matter where you go, it will never be as cool as it was just before you got there. So thanks for ruining it for everyone.

    Swing looooow, sweet Waaaarbonnet, comin for..to..carry..... me....yawn.....home......zzzzzzzz

  2. #12
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shadowmoss View Post
    Am I the only one who doesn't like my foot end higher than my head end? Maybe 'cause of the physiology differences between men and women...
    You are not alone... vive la difference!

  3. #13
    New Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by warbonnetguy View Post
    first off, people are talking about how high the suspension needs to be where it attaches to the tree. it will almost always be head height or higher. the farther apart the trees, the higher up you will need to attach to them.
    This explains much. Set mine up for the first time this weekend (was supposed to get out last month, but that trip got cancelled). I put the lines about head height but on two trees 15+ feet apart. I had previously put another hammock between these same two trees just last year. That one used rope. It worked great. My BB with webbing sunk to within an inch of the ground.

    Quote Originally Posted by warbonnetguy View Post
    the support lines should be running downward toward the hammock at roughly a 25-30 deg angle. you want the hammock at about chair height so you can easily sit down into it.
    Interesting. Pretty steep angle. Will have to make sure I achieve this next time. My problem here is I am only 5'6" high, so getting the webbing way up on the tree is tough. What's the "ideal" distance between the trees to make hanging a BB reasonable for someone of my height. I will mention that I prefer to have my hammock with me in in be 3 feet or more off the ground when all is said and done. In many areas where I backpack, that 3 feet is almost essential because of brush.

    Quote Originally Posted by warbonnetguy View Post
    ideally the ridgeline should not be very tight once you're laying down in the hammock, if it is, it means you need to attach the straps higher on the tree, and loosen them at the same time so the hammock is still at chair height. in other words if the ridgeline is guitar string tight when you're laying in the hammock, it's because you don't have the straps running at a 25-30 deg angle, you need to loosen them a good bit, and since the hammock is at chair height, you'll have to raise them on the tree to keep the hammock off the ground.
    Again, explains a lot. Anyone done a "height on tree versus distance apart of the trees" type chart to give an idea of what we're talking about here?

    I've been backpacking with hammock for more than 5 years now, but I felt like an idiot trying to get the BB hung properly this weekend. Never got it to where I was more than about 2 inches off the ground. Even with an overhand knot in the webbing, mine still kept sagging. Sagged to one point where I touched the ground. So, I tightened the lines, and it turns out I had it too taut but not high enough up on the trees apparently. Anyone have a picture of that 25-30 degree hang?

  4. #14
    gargoyle's Avatar
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    Shorter folks could carry one of thesehttp://www.basspro.com/webapp/wcs/st...kEnabled=false
    Ive used them before to climb trees for deer hunting, work nice, gets you up a few more feet if needed, add two or three or ten for birds-eye view. Won't damage the tree, required here in Michigan, no screw in style steps are allowed on fed. or state hunting lands.
    Or you could carry one of thesehttp://www.rei.com/product/782801 strap it on tree and climb up.
    Ambulo tua ambulo.

  5. #15
    eglazner, there is a really good chart somewhere on the distance vs atachment point height, i'll see if i can find it.

    the tighter you pull the suspension (the closer to horizontal) the greater the difference between unweighted height of the hammock and weighted height of the hammock. basically it will drop more when you get in. this is somewhat counter-intuitive because you'd think the tighter it is the less it would drop, but that's not the case. the lines cannot support a horizontal position when the hammock is weighted, so the hammock will drop quite a bit until the angle becomes more reasonable. if your lines start out at a 30+ deg angle, the hammock will drop very little once you get in.

    try starting at a 40-45 deg angle, get in and lay down. the ridgeline should be sagging. get out and tighten the suspension a little and lay down again. this make take several tries, but you're looking for the point where the ridgeline sags when you sit, but pulls tight when you lay down. when you find this, get out and take 10 steps back and look at the suspension angle and try to memorize it. (it's best to do all this before staking out the shock cord guylines, because their tension can mess with the angles of the empty unweighted hammock some.

    for a short person, i'd say you should look for trees closer to the min. distance, which is 12-14'. as long as the span is long enough to get your tarp in there, which will depend on the length of your tarp. you'll probably want a tree distance at least 1' longer than the rl of your tarp, a couple feet longer than the tarp is ideal, so for an 11' tarp, 13' would be good, you might be ok with 12'

  6. #16
    here it is: http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/a...5&d=1219329859

    as you can see, the attachment heights go up pretty quick as the trees get farther apart. some of those heights are for less than 30 deg angles. i'd say i often hang at 30+ deg. it's hard to tell the actual degrees your lines are at, but when the rl sags when you sit and tightens when you lay, it's just about perfect. it can defiantely be tighter than that and still be ok, but i think if you shoot for that whenever you can, you'll learn what it takes to get a comfortable hang pretty quick.
    Last edited by warbonnetguy; 07-13-2009 at 17:22.

  7. #17
    New Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by gargoyle View Post
    Shorter folks could carry one of thesehttp://www.basspro.com/webapp/wcs/st...kEnabled=false
    Ive used them before to climb trees for deer hunting, work nice, gets you up a few more feet if needed, add two or three or ten for birds-eye view. Won't damage the tree, required here in Michigan, no screw in style steps are allowed on fed. or state hunting lands.
    Or you could carry one of thesehttp://www.rei.com/product/782801 strap it on tree and climb up.
    My goal is to carry less. Not more.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by warbonnetguy View Post
    the tighter you pull the suspension (the closer to horizontal) the greater the difference between unweighted height of the hammock and weighted height of the hammock. basically it will drop more when you get in. this is somewhat counter-intuitive because you'd think the tighter it is the less it would drop, but that's not the case. the lines cannot support a horizontal position when the hammock is weighted, so the hammock will drop quite a bit until the angle becomes more reasonable. if your lines start out at a 30+ deg angle, the hammock will drop very little once you get in.

    try starting at a 40-45 deg angle, get in and lay down. the ridgeline should be sagging. get out and tighten the suspension a little and lay down again. this make take several tries, but you're looking for the point where the ridgeline sags when you sit, but pulls tight when you lay down. when you find this, get out and take 10 steps back and look at the suspension angle and try to memorize it. (it's best to do all this before staking out the shock cord guylines, because their tension can mess with the angles of the empty unweighted hammock some.

    for a short person, i'd say you should look for trees closer to the min. distance, which is 12-14'. as long as the span is long enough to get your tarp in there, which will depend on the length of your tarp. you'll probably want a tree distance at least 1' longer than the rl of your tarp, a couple feet longer than the tarp is ideal, so for an 11' tarp, 13' would be good, you might be ok with 12'
    Perfect. Thanks. Will give it a try this weekend.

  9. #19
    HappyCamper's Avatar
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    6. How many of you use snakeskins instead of the easy setup double holed back branding gives you? If using something else, Why?


    I use Brandon's sack for the hammock and use snakeskins for my tarp. Most people keep hammock and tarp separate because tarp can often be wet. I like snakeskins for my larger tarp. Makes it easier to setup, esp if windy.
    I intend to live forever, or die trying. -- Groucho Marx (1890 - 1977)

  10. #20
    Bug-Bait's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HappyCamper View Post
    6. How many of you use snakeskins instead of the easy setup double holed back branding gives you? If using something else, Why?


    I use Brandon's sack for the hammock and use snakeskins for my tarp. Most people keep hammock and tarp separate because tarp can often be wet. I like snakeskins for my larger tarp. Makes it easier to setup, esp if windy.
    I never saw the need for snakeskins until I tried hanging my tarp between the jib and the mainsail on a sailboat in a howling wind. It was next to impossible. I now know why folks really like them :^)

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