Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Central, IA
    Hammock
    Blackbird
    Tarp
    Cooke Custom Sew
    Posts
    83

    Does anyone use Accessory Cord?

    Does anyone use Accessory Cord for their setups?

    According to Sterling Rope, the 4mm accessory cord has a 1,000 lbs breaking strength.

    I'm sure you could use it for tarps and tie outs, but what about ridge lines or main suppesion lines?

    I haven't used it for anything yet and was just curious if it could be used.
    John

  2. #2
    Rain Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Hammock
    Modified HH Ultralite
    Tarp
    OES MacCat Deluxe
    Insulation
    DIY UQ & UGQ TQ
    Suspension
    whoopie slings
    Posts
    2,102
    Images
    7

    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by DiverDn View Post
    I'm sure you could use it for tarps and tie outs, but what about ridge lines or main suppesion lines?
    My rule of thumb is that the stated breaking strength is good for about 10% in actual use. I arrive at that as follows:

    Knots can halve the breaking strength (actually, they can do worse than that). That gets you to 500 lbs or less.

    The angle of declination can easily cut the breaking strength by more than half (check the algebra and physics of horizontal lines vs vertical lines). That gets you to 250 lbs or less.

    Also, no one is a static weight. A dynamic weight is much more than a static weight, so there goes at least another half. That gets you to 125 lbs or less.

    You weight 125 lbs? And that's with no margin for safety.

    Anyway, your mileage may vary, but that's how I calculate it when I'm hanging over rocks.

    Rain Man

    .

  3. #3
    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    Hammock
    Blackbird
    Tarp
    MacCat Standard
    Insulation
    Winter Yeti, MWUQ4
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    8,012
    Images
    32
    One can never be too careful, but I think Rain Man's calculation is quite a bit more conservative than any other I've heard. I'd feel comfortable using 1000lbs breaking strength on my setup...I'd just be careful that it never got unnecessary knots in it, no damage from UV/trees/etc...and I'm always pretty careful about not bouncing in the hammock. I do usually swing, though.

    Anyway, I think it would hold you but there's probably more suitable cord for supports...hard to say w/o seeing what you have. Does it have a sheath? Is it stretchy under a heavy load? Lots of considerations. But even if it's not suitable for supports you could still probably use it as a ridgeline, at least.
    “Republics are created by the virtue, public spirit, and intelligence of the citizens. They fall when the wise are banished from the public councils because they dare to be honest, and the profligate are rewarded because they flatter the people, in order to betray them.” ~Judge Joseph Story

    - My site: http://www.tothewoods.net/
    - Designer, Jeff's Gear Hammock / Pack Cover by JRB

    IMPOSSIBLE JUST TAKES LONGER

  4. #4
    Ramblinrev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Milton, PA
    Hammock
    Hennessey Explorer Ultralight
    Tarp
    Hennessey Hex
    Insulation
    HH Super Shelter
    Suspension
    ring buckle
    Posts
    7,296
    Images
    101
    I would have no problem using it for ridgelines. Seems like overkill for that. But I might have a problem using it for suspension lines.
    I may be slow... But I sure am gimpy.

    "Bless you child, when you set out to thread a needle don't hold the thread still and fetch the needle up to it; hold the needle still and poke the thread at it; that's the way a woman most always does, but a man always does t'other way."
    Mrs. Loftus to Huck Finn

    We Don't Sew... We Make Gear! video series

    Important thread injector guidelines especially for Newbies

    Bobbin Tension - A Personal Viewpoint

  5. #5
    Senior Member TiredFeet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    MD
    Hammock
    TeeDee Bridge Hammock
    Tarp
    Customized JRB
    Insulation
    Down or IX
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    1,100
    Images
    34
    I'm with Rain Man on this.

    He may be more conservative than most people, but then rope strength ratings are for brand new rope, no knots.

    Start to use a rope in a hammock suspension with knots (you could just splice as several threads are now exploring) and you quickly degrade the rope strength. Tying and untying a knot introduces wear and any hardware you use is going to abrade the rope and degrade the strength.

    So after you have used a rope to hang a hammock a dozen times with the wear and abrasion, what is the rated strength of the rope now??? Totally unknown.

    The modern high tech single braid ropes available are relatively inexpensive when compared to the cost of possible injuries, I have to ask why bother with anything else?

    Personally I use only the highest rated 1/8" diameter single braid rope I can find. I figure that with the rope I use, even if I have to figure on only 30% of the strength remaining, I still have a strength of approximately 1,000 lbs. It costs approximately double something like Spyderline of equal diameter, but I have experienced one dump onto hard ground and considered myself lucky to have only badly bruised myself. It could easily have been worse. I don't gamble with such things anymore. As my girlfriend says, the cost to benefit ratio is just not favorable.

    Also, Rain Man is totally correct about the dynamic weight. Just the act of sitting in a hammock can introduce significant dynamic forces and that doesn't consider moving from a sitting position to lying down. I've seen people who consider falling backward into a hammock akin to sitting down in one. Most people lose a lot of their caution in hammocks after using one for a while and start moving about more energetically.
    Last edited by TiredFeet; 07-04-2009 at 19:56.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Central, IA
    Hammock
    Blackbird
    Tarp
    Cooke Custom Sew
    Posts
    83
    I am quite a ways north of 125lbs so I won't use it for suspension.

    Sorry I intended to post the link to the specs.

    It is 4mm accessory cord from Sterling Rope. http://www.sterlingrope.com/media/do...mbingSpecs.pdf

    I agree with most comments I would rather be safe than sorry. Getting old enough that I don't heal so well. I also would not have a problem using it for a ridge line that is not bearing the weight of the hammock, say for the tarp if it is rigged with a ridge line.

    thanks for the great responses.
    John

  7. #7
    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    Hammock
    Blackbird
    Tarp
    MacCat Standard
    Insulation
    Winter Yeti, MWUQ4
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    8,012
    Images
    32
    I meant for a structural ridgeline to set the sag of the hammock. That can still carry quite a bit of stress depending on how you set it up, but should be well under 1000 lbs in any case. This cord could also be good for tarps, though.

    Changing the subject only slightly...here's a consideration I use for my tarp guylines. I don't want them to be too strong. If I get a very strong gust, I want my guyline to fail before the tarp fabric fails b/c I can field repair a guyline with a square knot. But if my line is stronger than the tarp, the tarp will fail instead...and field repair of silnylon fabric isn't nearly as easy as tying a square knot. So I take a systems approach and make sure my tarp guyline is accessory cord strong enough to handle gusts, but nothing near 1000 lbs. JMHO. YMMV.
    “Republics are created by the virtue, public spirit, and intelligence of the citizens. They fall when the wise are banished from the public councils because they dare to be honest, and the profligate are rewarded because they flatter the people, in order to betray them.” ~Judge Joseph Story

    - My site: http://www.tothewoods.net/
    - Designer, Jeff's Gear Hammock / Pack Cover by JRB

    IMPOSSIBLE JUST TAKES LONGER

  8. #8
    sclittlefield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Northern woods of Maine
    Hammock
    It's a Secret.
    Tarp
    BWDD Winter Dream
    Insulation
    Crowsnest
    Suspension
    Slings
    Posts
    1,435
    Images
    95
    I've been using 4mm and 5mm accessory cord for suspension for quite some time now with absolutely no issues in durability, and never a cause for alarm. I am careful not to hang over dangerous ground (which I would recommend no matter what you're using for suspension).

    I use 2.75mm glo-cord for a structural ridgeline. Never a problem.

    I do not recommend it, however, for suspension. It's a nylon thing. It stretches so much I find it frustrating to use. The only reason I've been using it is because it's the only thing I can get locally and have not had the spare cash to order some Amsteel Blue or poly straps from Strapworks.

    I do find that nylon for a structural ridgeline works well - because it stretches. There's less chance for failure somewhere when the ridgeline can adapt a bit. A structural ridgeline is not supposed to be used to hold your weight - it's there to set the sag and hold the bug net off my face. There are even some folks who use mason line for the ridgeline.
    DIY Gear Supply - Your source for DIY outdoor gear.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •