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  1. #1
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    when to use a hammock pad?

    I am going to use a hammock for the first time on the Lost Coast Trail in Northern Cali and am wondering if i need a pad or not.... the lows for july are about 50 according to weather.com. Do others use pads always are only for cooler weather?

  2. #2
    Senior Member headchange4u's Avatar
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    You are right on the borderline as far as needing a pad. If you are a warm sleeper you will probably be fine. I would think about maybe taking a cheap blue WalMart pad with you just in case. Are you using any other kind of bottom insulation?

    Wind would also factor in on if you need a pad or not. Be sure to set up your tarp perpendicular to the wind and that will stop a lot of drafts.
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  3. #3
    2Questions's Avatar
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    Talking Hammock pad use

    I think you'll find a wide array of opinion here on the forum concerning pads, quilts, underquilts, etc. It's the best place to learn about hammocking.

    As for me, I use a sectional pad. During cold weather I take everything, body section, lower leg section, and side wing extensions. See my gallery for some pics of the sectional pad. Spring and Fall I ditch the lower legs section. During summer, if I take anything at all, I'll only take the lower leg section. It is sized to fit my Thermarest lounger chair. Sometimes an occassional dip in nighttime temp during summer makes me glad I have it. Or if I find myself perching on a rock enjoying the scenic view the pad makes it softer on the butt. All the sectional pieces are made from 3/8 Closed cell foam (CCF) and slip covered with Neatsheet material. They fit together via velcro.

    In summary, you must learn what is right for you at different temperatures. Hammocking, IMHO, is so much more comfortable than tenting, offers greater flexibility of where to camp, and weighs in at great numbers. The downside or reality is that there is a learning curve to it. I've been at it for a while and still learn from this forum about how to do things easier, lighter, or more effectively. There are a bunch of good people here. Check in often.

    Good luck now that you've begun the adventure of hammocking!!

  4. #4
    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
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    Yes. Very few people sleep warmly enough that they don't need some sort of bottom-side insulation at 50 F. A pad is one option...there are a few others.

    Be sure to use it a time or seven before you rely on it in the field. It would suck to have your whole trip ruined b/c you can't sleep at night...especially if it's a very simple fix if you'd known about it beforehand. There's definitely a learning curve. This forum, the hammock archives at www.whiteblaze.net, and a handful of websites have plenty of information to keep you warm, dry and comfortable...just figure out what works for you before you hike out.
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  5. #5
    neo's Avatar
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    Last edited by neo; 04-30-2007 at 16:48.

  6. #6
    Senior Member FanaticFringer's Avatar
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    Your bum will thank you. Take a pad.
    "Every day above ground is a good day"

  7. #7
    Oms's Avatar
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    So what is a reasonable temp to just use one quilt, say 65 and up? I would think that anything less with a breeze underneath would be to much convective heat loss. Not having much experience with a hammock I have been thinking about summer use. I would like to lighten my load even more by just bringing one quilt. Would it be more advisible to use the Nest underneath and wear a fleece shirt letting the quilt wrap around or use nothing underneath and use it as a top quilt? How do some of you do it?

  8. #8
    Senior Member blackbishop351's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oms View Post
    So what is a reasonable temp to just use one quilt, say 65 and up? I would think that anything less with a breeze underneath would be to much convective heat loss. Not having much experience with a hammock I have been thinking about summer use. I would like to lighten my load even more by just bringing one quilt. Would it be more advisible to use the Nest underneath and wear a fleece shirt letting the quilt wrap around or use nothing underneath and use it as a top quilt? How do some of you do it?
    It seems to be a personal preference as to where to put a single quilt. I personally like to have something on top and nothing underneath in mid-temps. I've been using a MI poncho liner on top, partially wrapped underneath me. Others have posted that they prefer an underquilt and some midweight clothing instead.
    "Physics is the only true science. All else is stamp collecting." - J. J. Thompson

  9. #9
    Senior Member lvleph's Avatar
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    I have actually hiked a little in the redwoods. I think the one thing you will find with using a pad, especially in that area, is that you will build up a lot of moisture between you and the pad. I like using a pad, but that is one problem. Have fun on your hike and try to stay dry (I know it won't happen, but try).

    For me it was actually too warm for a 1/4" pad in the mid 50s, but everyone is different. However, with out the pad I got a little chilly. I think in an area like the pacific northwest one should have a hammock sock. I think this could prevent a lot of condensation and also help with blowing wind.
    Last edited by lvleph; 04-16-2007 at 06:33.

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