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Thread: webbing at REI

  1. #11
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    No, I cannot tell you what exactly the HH stuff is, but it looks thinner and wider than the Speer stuff to me.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

  2. #12
    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
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    The HH huggers I have are 1" nylon. They probably stretch a bit but you can't really tell with that short length. With full-length webbing like Ed uses, you could tell.

    That tubular webbing is overkill but it would work. That strength is over 4000 lbs, where Ed's is 700. I made some huggers from that tubular stuff...works fine.

    104" of the tubular stuff is ~4.5 oz for ~.50 oz/ft
    80" of the 1" HH huggers is ~1.75 oz for ~.26 oz/ft
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  3. #13
    Senior Member gstepclassical's Avatar
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    All of the research I have done on the web states that tubular webbing, either nylon or polyester, is low stretch.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by gstepclassical View Post
    All of the research I have done on the web states that tubular webbing, either nylon or polyester, is low stretch.
    Low stretch is a relative term. I use 1" tubular webbing for slacklining and I can tell you, it DOES stretch quite a bit. Wrapped around a tree though, at that length, I doubt the stretch will be noticeable. I do think 1" webbing is a little overkill for this type of application though...

    -JR

  5. #15
    Senior Member blackbishop351's Avatar
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    Tubular climbing stuff is definitely overkill for what we need, unless you're using some that's really small (~ 1/2").

    I've seen the larger stuff (~ 1") stretch a LOT...and talked to a lot of climbers who say that every piece of rolled climbing gear - ropes, webbing, whatever - is MEANT to stretch in order to absorb high dynamic loads.

    Also - and this comes from Ed Speer - nylon is not the best choice for hammocks because of its high memory. It springs back almost to its original length after stretching. The poly stuff that Ed sells stretches initially but then stays stretched - hence the term "low-memory stretch." This is nice for us because it means we only have to wake up on the ground once or twice when we first use it
    "Physics is the only true science. All else is stamp collecting." - J. J. Thompson

  6. #16
    Senior Member gstepclassical's Avatar
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    I just got back from a clinic on mountaineering and rock climbing where I work. This was conducted by someone who used to guide at Mt Rainier and has climbed to the summit 16 different times. He has also climed the second highest peak outside of Asia somwhere in South America. The point is this guys life depends on his equipment. I specificly asked about 1" military spec. nylon tubular webbing and he said almost no stretch. They use it for anchor points when top roping. Also, not all climbing rope stretches. It depends on the type of climbing you are doing as to what type of rope you are using, static line or dynamic load. This info can be obtained from the packaging when you buy the rope. It will list, among other things, the elongation characteristics and load rating.
    Last edited by gstepclassical; 04-18-2007 at 06:31.

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